Make Chiangmai Mail | your Homepage | Bookmark

Chiangmai 's First English Language Newspaper

Pattaya Blatt | Pattaya Mail | Pattaya Mail TV

 

Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Update July 2018


Home
Thailand News
World News
World Sports
Arts - Entertainment - Lifestyles
Book Review
Health & Wellbeing
Odds & Ends
Science & Nature
Technology
Update by Natrakorn Paewsoongnern
 
 
 
WORLD SPORTS
 

Update July 16, 2018

France beat Croatia 4-2 to win 2nd FIFA World Cup

French players celebrate with the FIFA World Cup trophy after the final match between France and Croatia in the Luzhniki Stadium in Moscow, Russia, Sunday, July 15. (AP Photo/Matthias Schrader)

Graham Dunbar

Moscow (AP) — Taking turns sliding across the rain-soaked turf holding the World Cup trophy tight, teenager Kylian Mbappe and the rest of France's players acted like the youthful bunch they are.

Nothing, not a Pussy Riot protest nor a postgame downpour that soaked Russian President Vladimir Putin, was going to stop the party.

It carried on long after a thrilling 4-2 win over Croatia on Sunday. In the locker room with French President Emmanuel Macron striking poses with players, then a champagne-spraying, water-splashing interruption of the coach Didier Deschamps' news conference.

"Sorry! They're young and they're happy," said Deschamps, like a proud father.

Deschamps had good reason to indulge them. His team is mostly aged 25 or under and can return almost intact to defend their title in 2022 in Qatar.

"Our children are going to be very proud," forward Antoine Griezmann said. "The World Cup, it's a lot."

The 19-year-old Mbappe became only the second teen after Pele to score in a World Cup final.

Mbappe had just shown his electrifying speed in the 52nd minute when play was held up by four protesters who ran onto the field. Russian punk band Pussy Riot later took credit for the incident — watched from the VIP seats by Putin, whose government once jailed members of the activist group. Charges were filed against the group Sunday, too.

Putin was later on the field to award medals to the players in a ceremony soon drenched in rain and joy. As thunder pealed and lightning cracked, FIFA president Gianni Infantino handed France captain Hugo Lloris the gold World Cup trophy.

Gold confetti stuck to the soaked Les Bleus as they paraded the trophy around the Luzhniki Stadium, a final act of an enthralling tournament in which Croatia reached their first final while powers Brazil, Germany and Argentina went home early.

About 12 minutes after a protester gave Mbappe a double high-five on the field, Mbappe sent a right-footed shot from 25 yards past goalkeeper Danijel Subasic. The goal put France up 4-1, closing the door on Croatia who had been the better team until Mbappe took control.

The only other teen to score in a World Cup final was Pele, who was 17 when Brazil beat Sweden 5-2 in 1958.

Mbappe, who plays for Paris Saint-Germain in the French league, was born months after France won their only other World Cup title in 1998.

"I have a whole story to write," Mbappe said. "This is just the beginning."

Paul Pogba and Griezmann, France's two other key creative players, also scored. Pogba played a disciplined role in Russia, but his natural joy was evident celebrating his 18-yard shot, and leading the champagne shower for Deschamps.

But it was Mbappe who put the match out of reach with a furious passage of play in the second half. In the 59th, a run from Mbappe started a play that ended up with Pogba on the edge of the penalty area. With his second attempt, the midfielder curled his shot beyond Subasic.

Griezmann scored from the penalty spot in the 38th minute fully four minutes after his corner kick was knocked out of play by Ivan Perisic's arm. The referee ruled it handball only after a video review, just as the first thunders claps boomed around the stadium.

"In a World Cup final, you do not give such a penalty," Croatia coach Zlatko Dalic said.

France took the lead in the 18th when Croatia's tallest outfield player, 1.90-meter forward Mario Mandzukic, rose to meet Griezmann's free kick with the top of his head. He deflected it past his own goalkeeper.

Perisic and Mandzukic both scored for Croatia, first to equalize in the 28th minute and later as a consolation goal in the 69th, embarrassing Lloris with a flicked shot as the France goalkeeper tried to dribble the ball out of his goalmouth.

But the three-goal lead was too much for the red-and-white-checkered squad that made a habit of coming back at the World Cup — and played three straight 120-minute games before the final.

"We were dominant, we had control," Dalic said through a translator. "What we've had in terms of luck over the tournament, we lacked that today."

Deschamps became only the third man to win the World Cup as a player and a coach. He joined Mario Zagallo of Brazil and Franz Beckenbauer, who captained West Germany.

France's captain 20 years ago, Deschamps was lifted up by his players on the field and flung into the air several teams and caught. The normally staid coach did a few skipping dance steps in the rain before stopping and laughing at himself.

It was that kind of unbridled evening for the French who won with an exuberance not often seen in a mostly efficient, controlled title run.

Back home in France, tens of thousands of fans headed to the Eiffel Tower to watch a broadcast on giant screens that Paris police closed the area more than two hours before kickoff.

Two years ago at home, France flopped in a European Championship final they were expected to win against Portugal.

"But maybe if we had been European champions we would not be champions today," Deschamps said.


Djokovic wins 4th Wimbledon by beating Anderson in 3 sets

Novak Djokovic of Serbia returns the ball to Kevin Anderson of South Africa during the men's singles final match at the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Sunday July 15. (Neil Hall/Pool via AP)

Howard Fendrich

London (AP) — Novak Djokovic was disconsolate and injured when he left Wimbledon a year ago, quitting during his quarterfinal because of a painful right elbow that would need surgery.

Djokovic was so dispirited by his upset exit at the French Open last month that he vowed, in the heat of the moment, to skip the grass-court circuit.

Good thing he didn't stick to that. Just look at him now, back at his best and Wimbledon's champion for the fourth time. Djokovic ended a Grand Slam drought that lasted more than two seasons, grabbing a lead in Sunday's final right away against a weary Kevin Anderson and holding off a late challenge to win 6-2, 6-2, 7-6 (3).

Anderson nearly managed to extend the match, five times standing just a point away from forcing a fourth set. Djokovic held steady on each one, then was as superior in the tiebreaker as he was most of the sun-drenched afternoon.

It is Djokovic's 13th major trophy, the fourth-highest total in the history of men's tennis, trailing only Roger Federer's 20, Rafael Nadal's 17 and Pete Sampras' 14.

But it's also Djokovic's first since he completed a career Grand Slam at the 2016 French Open.

During that time, he struggled with the first major injury of his professional career, one that forced him off the tour for the last half of 2017. He eventually had an operation this February, and as his losses accumulated, his ranking fell out of the top 20 for the first time in more than a decade.

At No. 21, Djokovic is the lowest-ranked Wimbledon titlist since Goran Ivanisevic in 2001.

Under a pale blue sky interrupted by only the occasional soft white puff of cloud, with the temperature at 86 degrees (30 Celsius), Djokovic started so well, and Anderson shakily.

That might have been easy to anticipate beforehand.

This was, after all, the 22nd Grand Slam final for Djokovic, and the second for Anderson, a 6-foot-8 powerful server who was the runner-up at last year's U.S. Open and was aiming to become the first South African man to win at Wimbledon.

Plus, Anderson could be excused for exhaustion. His semifinal was the second-longest Grand Slam match in history, lasting more than 6 hours until he edged John Isner 26-24 in the fifth set. And that followed another extended fifth set in his 13-11 upset of eight-time champion Federer in the quarterfinals.

So it was no wonder that, with all of that time on court, all of that stress on his racket-swinging arm, Anderson was visited by a trainer after Sunday's opening set to get his right elbow massaged.

Anderson was so out of sorts, his strokes so off-the-mark, that Djokovic gathered eight of the first 10 games even though he only conjured up two winners. No need for more, because Anderson gifted him 15 unforced errors in that span.

By the conclusion of a third consecutive dud of a straight-set men's singles final at the All England Club, Anderson had made 32 unforced errors, and the steady Djokovic merely 13.

Another key: Djokovic was able to handle Anderson's big serves much better than previous opponents. Widely considered the top returner in the game today, Djokovic broke Anderson four times. Consider that Anderson held in each of his last 27 service games against Isner, and dropped his very first on Sunday.

And one more: Djokovic saved all seven break points he faced, including five that would have given Anderson the third set.

As much as Djokovic is known for his body-bending defense and unerring reads on opponents' serves, he's also someone who fills his matches with histrionics and exaggerated reactions, whether violently smacking the side of his shoe with his racket — as he did against Nadal — or tearing off his shirt to celebrate a victory.

This day was no different. Angered by fans making noise during points, he told the chair umpire to tell them to shut up, adding a colorful word in there. He pointed to his ear after winning one point, as if to say: "Who are you cheering for now?!" He blew a kiss toward the stands after another.

But when he broke Anderson for the second time in three service games at the outset, Djokovic simply shook a clenched fist while calmly looking at his guest box above the scoreboard. The bright yellow digits on there showed that Djokovic already led 4-1 after all of 18 minutes.

Might as well have declared him the champion, right then and there.

It was so lopsided for the first hour-plus that spectators began pulling for Anderson, likely in the hopes of getting more tennis for the price of their tickets, which carry a face value of 210 pounds (about $275).

Just his earning a random point, even via a Djokovic miscue, was reason to roar, it seemed. Surely, Anderson appreciated the support. Didn't do a thing to alter the ultimate outcome, however.

When Anderson pushed a forehand return into the net to end it, Djokovic exhaled. After they shook hands, Djokovic performed his ritual of bending down to grab a couple of blades of grass and plopping them in his mouth, savoring the triumph.


Pacquiao wins 60th career fight with seventh-round knockout

 

Manny Pacquiao of the Philippines, right, fights Lucas Matthysse of Argentina during their WBA World welterweight title bout in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Sunday, July 15. (AP Photo/Yam G-Jun)

Eileen Ng

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (AP) — Manny Pacquiao won for the 60th time with his first stoppage in nine years, and made a proclamation.

"This is it. I am back in boxing," the 39-year-old Pacquiao said after his seventh-round knockout of Lucas Matthysse for the World Boxing Association welterweight title on Sunday. "I am not done. I'm still there."

It was Pacquiao's first bout since a contentious loss last year to Jeff Horn in Australia, and since parting ways with longtime trainer Freddie Roach to work with Buboy Fernandes.

"It's just a matter of time. You have to rest and get it back and that's what I did."

Pacquiao (60-7-2, 39 KOs) knocked Matthysse down onto one knee in the third and fifth rounds. He knocked the Argentine down again in the seventh, and Matthysse spat out his mouthpiece, causing a frenzy among Pacquiao fans in the stadium.

"I am not boasting but ... I think he's hurting from my punches," said Pacquiao, who hadn't won by knockout since 2009. "Every punch that I throw, he's hurt. I think he's scared of my punches."

Matthysse, who won 36 out of 39 matches by knockout, said Pacquiao was a "great fighter, a great legend," adding that he planned to take a break.

Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte and Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad attended the fight, the biggest in the country since the 1975 heavyweight clash between Muhammad Ali and Australian Joe Bugner.

"I would like to congratulate Senator Manny Pacquiao for giving us pride and bringing the Filipino nation together once more," said Duterte, who flew to Malaysia for the bout ahead of an official visit.

Duterte said in a statement that Pacquiao has proven himself again as "one of the greatest boxers of all time" and that the win will cement his legacy in the sport.

Scores of screaming Filipino fans in the stadium waved flags and chanted "Manny, Manny" throughout the match. Pacquiao's rise to fame from an impoverished rural childhood to become one of the world's wealthiest sportsmen over his 23-year career has made him a national hero.

Pacquaio said he will return to his work as a senator for now but won't be hanging up the gloves just yet.

"I am addicted to boxing. I really love to fight and bring honor to my country," he said. "That's my heart's desire."

Horn, who lost his WBO welterweight title to Terence Crawford in Las Vegas last month, was quick to respond to Pacquiao's victory.

"Congratulations Manny Pacquiao," Horn posted on Instagram. "Rematch?"

In the other title fights, Filipino Jhack Tepora had a knockout win over Edivaldo Oretga of Mexico for the interim WBA featherweight title. Venezuela's Carlos Canizales defended his WBA world light flyweight title against China's Lu Bin, who had been aiming to become the first boxer to win a major world title in just two career fights. South African Moruti Mthalane got a unanimous decision against Pakistan's Muhammad Waseem to capture the IBF flyweight title.


Suwannapura gets first LPGA Tour win at Marathon Classic

Thidapa Suwannapura kisses the trophy after winning the LPGA golf Marathon Classic, Sunday, July 15, at Highland Meadows in Sylvania, Ohio. (Kurt Steiss/The Blade via AP)

Sylvania, Ohio (AP) — Thidapa Suwannapura's main focus going into the Marathon Classic was trying to put together four solid rounds that would help her keep her LPGA Tour card.

She doesn't have to worry about that any longer.

Suwannapura picked up her first win on Sunday, closing with a 6-under 65 and birdieing the first playoff hole to defeat Brittany Lincicome at Highland Meadows.

In the playoff, Suwannapura converted a short birdie putt after Lincicome hit her second shot into a water hazard and scrambled for par.

"I never expect it was going to be today at all. I've just been struggling the whole year," said Suwannapura, whose previous best finish was seventh at the 2014 Kingsmill Championship. "Finally all my work I've been doing has come out and shown up today. After I knocked that last putt in, it just felt like a dream come true."

With the win, the 25-year-old Thai player has an exemption through the 2020 season. She is also the sixth first-time winner on tour this year

Suwannapura picked up three strokes over her final two holes, making eagle on the par-5 17th and closing with a birdie on the par-5 18th to finish at 14-under 270. She then had to wait for the final seven groups to finish.

"I did not think or expect that 14 would be good enough, because I know there were two par-5s coming in on 17 and 18, and it's a good opportunity for players to make birdie," Suwannapura said. "I was just chilling in the clubhouse, you know, being silly and stuff, trying to relax, and see what they're doing. Now, like, 'Oh, I have to go warm-up and try to win the tournament.'"

Lincicome shot 67. She had a chance to win in regulation, but her birdie putt from about 10 feet did a nearly 360-degree turn around the edge of the cup and stayed out.

Despite having eight career victories, including this season's opener in the Bahamas, the 32-year-old Lincicome said she was extremely nervous standing over that putt.

"I was shaking so bad. I had to take so many deep breaths. So it's kind of cool to have those nerves, but learning how to play through them after 12 years of being a pro ... 14 years of being a pro, I still haven't figured it out, so that's a little disappointing," she said. "(The putt) caught a lot of the hole, so I feel like I hit a pretty good putt for how nervous I was. I really haven't seen one that aggressive in a long time, so that was just unfortunate, really."

Next up for the big-hitting Lincicome: a start against the men at the PGA Tour's Barbasol Championship in Kentucky. She will become the first woman since 2004 to play in a PGA Tour event.

Third-round leader Brooke Henderson led by two shots after six holes, but struggled the rest of the way. Back-to-back bogeys on the 14th and 15th holes dropped her out of the lead. The 20-year-old Canadian finished with a 2-under 69, one shot out of the playoff.

"Sometimes golf is weird. Sometimes it just doesn't go your way, and that was kind of me the last four holes," said Henderson, who lost for only the second time in six occasions she has led after 54 holes.

Besides the tour exemption, Suwannapura's win came with another bonus. She was one of five players to earn a spot in the Women's British Open at Royal Lytham & St. Annes.

The top five players not already exempt earned spots. The other qualifiers were Daniela Darquea, Celine Herbin, Mina Harigae and Mel Reid.


Degenkolb masters cobblestones as Porte crashes out of Tour

Belgium's Greg van Avermaet, wearing the overall leader's yellow jersey, left, and Slovakia's Peter Sagan, wearing the best sprinter's green jersey, ride over a cobblestone section of the ninth stage of the Tour de France cycling race near Arras, France, Sunday, July 15. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena )

Andrew Dampf

Roubaix, France (AP) — Richie Porte sat on the pavement grasping his right shoulder and grimacing in pain. A fan helped Chris Froome get going after he tumbled onto grass lining the road. Romain Bardet recovered from three punctured tires.

And they were only the highest-profile riders to face mishaps in the action-packed cobblestoned Stage 9 of the Tour de France on Sunday.

Every cyclist who reached the finish was covered in dust — many with their jerseys torn to shreds from crashes.

Spanish rider Gorka Izaguirre had the unusual experience of his rear wheel buckling to the point that it looked like something out of a scrap heap.

John Degenkolb won a three-man sprint to take victory in a memorable stage, while overall contender Porte crashed out of the race.

Yellow-jersey holder Greg Van Avermaet crossed second and increased his overall lead to 43 seconds ahead of Geraint Thomas, a teammate of Froome's at Sky. Yves Lampaert of Quick-Step finished third.

"It was a pretty hectic day," Van Avermaet said after the dust settled.

Added Thomas, "It was just hard all day from kilometer zero. You've got to be in the right position but you also need the luck because it's easy to puncture or get caught up in something."

Froome, the four-time champion, crossed in the main pack, 27 seconds behind, overcoming a crash with 45 kilometers to go that saw him go over the top of teammate Gianni Moscon.

"I'm relieved to get through today and looking forward to getting into the mountains now where the real race for GC (general classification) will start," Froome said.

Froome moved up to eighth overall, 1:42 behind Van Avermaet, who is not a threat in the mountains.

Porte, the BMC team leader, crashed out of the Tour 10 kilometers into the 156.5-kilometer leg — before any of the 15 cobblestone sections. He was later diagnosed with a fractured right clavicle.

Porte also crashed out of last year's Tour in the ninth stage, on a mountain descent.

"It won't be easy for him to get back in his mind," teammate Van Avermaet said. "The good thing is that his crash is not as bad as last year so he will recover faster."

Rigoberto Uran, last year's runner-up, and Mikel Landa, one of three leaders of the Movistar team, also each crashed and lost time.

Bardet, the French hope who finished on the podium the last two years, finished only seven seconds behind the main pack despite having to be paced back to the peloton three times.

Among the favorites in the overall standings apart from Froome: Alejandro Valverde is fifth (1:31 behind); Rafal Majka sixth (1:32); Jakob Fuglsang seventh (1:33); Adam Yates ninth (1:42); Landa 10th (1:42); Vincenzo Nibali 12th (1:48); Tom Dumoulin 15th (2:03); and Bardet 17th (2:32).

It was the first career victory at the Tour for Degenkolb, who rides for the Trek-Segafredo team. The German rider won the Paris-Roubaix single-day classic, which covers much of the same course, in 2015.

Degenkolb was the victim of a serious training accident in January 2016 when a car drove into oncoming traffic. Then he crashed in Paris-Roubaix this year and injured his knee.

"You start doubting if you can still do it," Degenkolb said. "That is the hardest part to don't lose the trust in yourself and that you can still be up there. I am so happy that my wife and my family gave me the strength to do this to give it 100 percent and work hard. It is amazing."

Degenkolb became the third rider to win both Paris-Roubaix and a cobbled stage at the Tour after Roger De Vlaeminck and Bernard Hinault. His average speed over the stage was 45.9 kph overall and 39.8 kph on the cobbles.

The route starting in Arras contained the highest number of cobblestone sections since the 1980 Tour, with nearly 22 kilometers altogether.

While it wasn't rainy and muddy like in April for the Paris-Roubaix race, the heat and sun made it dry and dusty.

Others who crashed included: Dylan Groenewegen, the Dutch rider who won the previous two stages; Froome's Sky teammates Egan Bernal and Michal Kwiatkowski; American hope Tejay van Garderen and Italian sprinter Sonny Colbrelli.

After the first rest day Monday, the Tour resumes in the Alps on Tuesday with a 158.5-kilometer leg from Annecy to Le Grand-Bornand featuring four serious climbs.


Update July 14-15, 2018

Anderson tops Isner 26-24 at Wimbledon; other SF suspended

Kevin Anderson of South Africa celebrates winning a point from John Isner of the US during their men's singles semifinal match at the Wimbledon Tennis Championships, in London, Friday July 13. (AP Photo/Glyn Kirk, Pool)

Howard Fendrich

London (AP) — To say that Kevin Anderson won this interminable Wimbledon semifinal, and that John Isner lost it, didn't really seem fair. To Anderson, anyway.

They had played on and on, through 6 1/2 hours of ho-hum hold after ho-hum hold, during the second-longest match in the history of a tournament that began in 1877, all the way until the never-ending serving marathon did, finally, end at 26-24 in the fifth set Friday, with Anderson claiming the most important of the 569 points — the last.

So when Anderson left Centre Court, well aware that his 7-6 (6), 6-7 (5), 6-7 (9), 6-4, 26-24 victory earned him the chance to win his first Grand Slam title at age 32, the South African said: "At the end, you feel like this is a draw between the two of us."

He continued: "John's such a great guy, and I really feel for him, because if I'd been on the opposite side, I don't know how you can take that, playing for so long and coming up short."

Only one match at Wimbledon ever lasted longer: Isner's 2010 first-round victory over Nicolas Mahut, the longest match in tennis history. It went more than 11 hours over three days and finished 70-68 in the fifth on Court 18, which now bears a plaque commemorating it.

Friday's contest lasted so long, the day's second semifinal didn't finish.

Novak Djokovic was leading Rafael Nadal 6-4, 3-6, 7-6 (9) in a compelling showdown filled with entertaining points that was suspended as soon as the third set concluded at just past 11 p.m., the curfew at the All England Club. Some people in the stands booed the decision to halt the match after a fantastic tiebreaker in which Nadal wasted three set points at 6-5, 7-6 and 8-7. Djokovic cashed in on his second when Nadal's backhand found the net after an 18-stroke exchange.

Because Nadal and Djokovic didn't begin playing until after 8 p.m., the retractable roof above the main stadium was shut between the matches and the arena's artificial lights were turned on. Now they'll come back Saturday to figure out who will face Anderson in the final, resuming at 1 p.m. local time, under the roof.

The women's final between Serena Williams and Angelique Kerber will then follow. That creates an unusual situation: Instead of a standard 2 p.m. start, Williams and Kerber won't know exactly when their match will begin.

Anderson will certainly appreciate the chance to put his feet up ahead of Sunday's final, while Nadal and Djokovic — who have a combined 29 Grand Slam titles between them, five at Wimbledon — push each other some more.

Anderson's fifth set alone lasted nearly 3 hours as his semifinal became a test of endurance more than skill.

"He stayed the course incredibly well," said the No. 9 seed Isner, a 33-year-old American playing in his first major semifinal. "Just disappointed to lose. I was pretty close to making a Grand Slam final and it didn't happen."

Anderson finally earned the must-have, go-ahead service break with the help of a point in which the right-hander tumbled to his backside, scrambled back to his feet and hit a shot lefty.

"That definitely brings a smile to my face," said Anderson, the runner-up to Nadal at last year's U.S. Open. "At that stage, you're just trying to fight in every single moment, and I was like, 'Just get up!'"

The No. 8 seed Anderson eliminated eight-time Wimbledon champion Roger Federer in a 13-11 fifth set in the quarterfinals Wednesday. Between that and the energy-sapper against Isner, it's hard to imagine how Anderson will have much left for his second Slam final.

Wimbledon doesn't use tiebreakers in the fifth set for men, or third set for women, so there's nothing to prevent a match from continuing ad infinitum. Both Isner and Anderson said they'd like to see that change.

At one point in the fifth set, a spectator shouted, "Come on, guys! We want to see Rafa!"

The 6-foot-8 Anderson and 6-10 Isner go way back, to their college days, Isner at Georgia, Anderson at Illinois. In the pros, Isner had won eight of 11 previous matchups. But this one was as close as can be.

There wasn't a whole lot of intrigue, or momentum shifts. The serving, though, was something else. Isner pounded his at up to 142 mph; Anderson reached 136 mph. They combined for 102 aces: 53 by Isner, 49 by Anderson.

"The effort they both put in and the performance and the guts, the way they competed — a lot to be proud of," said Justin Gimelstob, one of Isner's coaches.

Both failed to seize early opportunities. Isner wasted a set point in the opener. Anderson served for the third at 5-3, got broken, and then had a pair of set points in that tiebreaker, double-faulting one away.

By the latter stages, with break chances so rare, murmurs would spread through the Centre Court stands whenever a game's returner got to love-15 or love-30.

Could we be about to see the sixth and last break of a match that would end up with 90 holds?

Repeatedly, the answer was, of course, "No," even when Anderson held break points at 7-all, 10-all and 17-all. The 10-all game ended with Isner hitting a forehand passing winner on the run to hold, then letting his momentum carry him directly to his sideline chair, where he plopped himself down.

By the end, he was looking exhausted, leaning over to rest a hand on a knee between points.

"I feel pretty terrible," Isner said afterward. "My left heel is killing me and I have an awful blister on my right foot."

He never got a break point in the fifth set. Anderson finally came through on his sixth for a 25-24 lead, when Isner wearily put a backhand into the net.

Then Anderson served out the victory, with Isner sailing a forehand wide on match point.

Soon, they were meeting for an embrace.


Karunaratne leads Sri Lanka to 272-run lead 2 days into test

Sri Lanka's wicketkeeper Niroshan Dickwella, left, and teammates appeal successfully for the wicket of South Africa's Vernon Philander, second right, during the second day of their first test cricket match in Galle, Sri Lanka, Friday, July 13. (AP Photo/Eranga Jayawardena)

Galle, Sri Lanka (AP) — A day after making a remarkable unbeaten 158, Dimuth Karunaratne again tormented South Africa with a half-century as Sri Lanka began to lock up the first test after day two on Friday.

Karunaratne became only the fourth Sri Lankan to carry his bat through in the first innings, and his 60 second time around helped Sri Lanka to extend their lead to 272 runs.

South Africa face a tall order to save the match on a crumbling pitch with plenty of assistance for spin bowlers.

Hashim Amla, who captained South Africa to a 1-0 series win the last time the Proteas were in Sri Lanka in 2014, said 272 was already a handy lead for the pitch.

"If we manage to restrict them to, I'd say 320, then certainly that would be a good target for us," Amla said. "If a couple of us have a good partnership and one of us plays like Karunaratne played, that would get us close to that score."

The visitors were bowled out for 126, their lowest total against Sri Lanka, eclipsing the 168 all out in Durban in 2011.

"Like most pitches, as the days go on the deterioration occurs," Amla said. "Today, it spun a little bit more than yesterday. Tomorrow, maybe in the morning session it might not spin as much and then break up and spin more and more."

Sri Lanka were 111-4 in their second innings. Left-arm orthodox spinner Keshav Maharaj picked up the first three wickets but, with a healthy first-innings lead of 161 runs, the hosts could play with freedom.

With five overs left to stumps, South Africa paceman Kagiso Rabada dismissed Karunaratne, who was caught at slip by Hashim Amla.

Danushka Gunathilaka (17) added 51 runs for the first wicket with Karunaratne and the former was dismissed when he gave Maharaj the charge but couldn't clear the boundary. Rabada ran to his left from long-on to complete the catch.

With the total on 64, Maharaj struck twice in the space of four deliveries, removing Dhananjaya de Silva (9) and Kusal Mendis (0) in quick succession. Mendis unsuccessfully reviewed after being given leg before wicket.

Maharaj, however, couldn't trouble Karunaratne as the left-hander was solid in defence and punished the loose balls with a couple of elegant drives. He was Sri Lanka's best batsman in 2017 having posted over 1000 runs in tests. He missed Sri Lanka's recent tour of the Caribbean due to injury.

The Proteas had a dramatic collapse in the morning. Resuming from the overnight score of 4-1, the Proteas lost five wickets in the morning session for just 82 runs as the three-pronged spin attack of Rangana Herath, Dilruwan Perera and Lakshan Sandakan shared the bulk of the bowling.

Stand-in skipper Suranga Lakmal, the lone seamer in the Sri Lanka side, brought himself on in the last over before lunch and by then the spinners had sent down 37 overs.

From 51-6, South Africa recovered somewhat to reach 115-6 thanks to a seventh-wicket stand between Vernon Philander (18) and Francois du Plessis (49). Sri Lanka made the breakthrough after lunch as Philander was ruled leg before wicket to Dilruwan Perera, who finished with four wickets.

"What we have realized is that they don't play offspin too well," said Perera, who took 16 wickets in the 2014 series. "That has been evident in their last few series they have played. Maybe that is one reason why I picked up four wickets today.

"We didn't expect to get them bowled out for 126, though."

Lakmal hastened South Africa's collapse with a superb piece of seam bowling accounting for the last three batsmen including captain Du Plessis, who was clean bowled by a delivery that cut back in sharply.


Pacquiao, Matthysse make weight for welterweight title fight

Philippine senator and boxing champion Manny Pacquiao trains at a press preview in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Wednesday, July 11. Pacquiao is scheduled to fight Lucas Matthysse on July 15 for the World Boxing Association welterweight title in Malaysia. (AP Photo/Yam G-Jun)

Eileen Ng

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (AP) — Manny Pacquiao weighed in at a trim 146 pounds Saturday for his showdown with World Boxing Association welterweight champion Lucas Matthysse, who also made weight at 146.7 pounds.

The legendary Filipino eight-division champion and the Argentinian known as a knockout specialist were comfortably below the 147-pound limit when they stepped on a scale ahead of Sunday's bout, dubbed the "fight of champions."

Pacquiao, who turns 40 in December, returns to the ring a year after his shock-decision loss to Australia's Jeff Horn.

Pacquiao didn't speak after the weigh-in but the words on his long sleeve t-shirt made clear his determination to seek a 60th victory: "Fight On."

He has 38 of his 59 wins by knockout. Matthysse, 35, has 39 wins — 36 by knockout.

Pacquiao is fighting for the first time with new trainer Buboy Fernandez. He replaced Pacquiao's longtime trainer Freddie Roach, who Pacquiao dropped after 16 years together.


Chelsea fire manager Antonio Conte after 2 years in charge

Former Chelsea manager Antonio Conte is shown in this May 19, 2018 file photo. Chelsea fired Conte after a two-year tenure the London club said on Friday. (AP Photo/Rui Vieira)

Steve Douglas

London (AP) - Antonio Conte's protracted divorce from Chelsea was finalized on Friday when he was fired after a two-year tenure in which he won the English Premier League and FA Cup but failed to gain the power he craved at the London club.

Chelsea began a terse, four-sentence statement on its website, "Chelsea Football Club and Antonio Conte have parted company."

Leaving Stamford Bridge was always the likely outcome for Conte following a season in which Chelsea missed out on Champions League qualification after a fifth-place league finish, 30 points behind champions Manchester City. The Italian coach regularly grumbled about his failure to exert control, particularly over transfers.

Contrast that to the end of his first season at the club, where Conte was feted for leading Chelsea to the league title by seven points after a record-breaking run of 13 straight wins in the middle of the season, sparked by an inspired and bold change of formation.

Conte took preseason training this week at Chelsea's practice base in Cobham with players who hadn't featured at the World Cup, but reports emerged in the Italian media on Thursday saying Conte had been fired. That speculation only intensified when Chelsea midfielder Cesc Fabregas and former Chelsea captain John Terry paid tribute to Conte on social media.

"Thank you boss," Terry wrote on Twitter. "Great man, Great manager. I wish you every success in the future."

The club's 64-word announcement was eventually made on Friday, ending with: "We wish Antonio every success in his future career."

Conte still had a year left on a revised deal he signed last summer after delivering the fifth Premier League title since Roman Abramovich bought Chelsea in 2003. Only the pay was improved, though, with Conte's contract still running for just another two seasons — hardly a show of commitment by either the club or its manager.

The Italian's main gripe for the past year was Chelsea's failure to land the signings he really wanted for their Premier League title defence. Chelsea were beaten to the signing of Romelu Lukaku by Manchester United and then Fernando Llorente by Tottenham, for example.

"The club decides every player," he moaned last season.

Winning the FA Cup by beating Manchester United at Wembley Stadium in May — and getting one over his great managerial rival, Jose Mourinho — proved to be Conte's last hurrah and maintained his record of winning a trophy every season he has been in charge of Juventus — where he won the Serie A for four straight years — and Chelsea.

Chelsea seek a 13th permanent manager under Abramovich's ownership, and at possibly the most turbulent period of the Russian billionaire's trophy-filled reign.

It emerged in May that Abramovich had yet to have his British visa renewed amid a crackdown by authorities on associates of Russian President Vladimir Putin. Chelsea also halted plans to redevelop Stamford Bridge, citing an unfavorable climate to invest in the 500 million pound project.

Conte leaves amid reports in the British and Italian media that former Napoli coach Maurizio Sarri will take over at Chelsea for next season.

Sarri's future has been up in the air since Napoli hired Carlo Ancelotti as their new coach in May. Sarri spent three years at the club and led them to two runner-up finishes and a third place, playing an entertaining and high-energy brand of football like that seen at Man City under Pep Guardiola, Tottenham under Mauricio Pochettino, and Liverpool under Juergen Klopp.

Sarri didn't win a major title at Napoli, however, and that would not be tolerated at Chelsea.

As Conte and many of his predecessors have learned, even winning trophies is no guarantee of job security at Chelsea under Abramovich.


Update July 13, 2018

Serena Williams nears 8th Wimbledon title, 24th Slam overall

Serena Williams of the United States returns the ball to Germany's Julia Gorges during their women's singles semifinals match at the Wimbledon Tennis Championships, in London, Thursday July 12. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

Howard Fendrich

London (AP) — Yes, this will be Serena Williams' 10th Wimbledon final. Yes, it's her 30th title match at any major. And, well, sure, she's widely regarded as not just the best of her era, but any era.

Let others shrug at this latest accomplishment, as if all it signified were merely another chance at another in a long line of trophies. Williams is not shy about saying she, for one, is impressed by this. Rightly so. For it was only about 10 months ago she was having a baby and then dealing with a serious health scare that followed.

Even after all of that, even after more than a year away from the game, even in only the fourth tournament of her comeback, Williams showed she's still capable of dominance. Especially at the All England Club, where a relatively routine 6-2, 6-4 victory over 13th-seeded Julia Goerges of Germany on Thursday put Williams one win away from an eighth championship.

She's also closing in on her 24th Grand Slam title, which would equal Margaret Court's all-time record.

"A lot of people were saying, 'Oh, she should be in the final,'" the 36-year-old Williams said. "For me it's such a pleasure and a joy because, you know, less than a year ago, I was going through so much stuff."

After hitting five aces with a serve that reached 119 mph, delivering 16 winners to only seven unforced errors, and covering the court so well with speed and effort, Williams will face another German, 11th-seeded Angelique Kerber, on Saturday.

"Whatever happens, honestly," Williams said, "it's an incredible effort from me."

The left-handed Kerber, a former No. 1 and two-time major champion, beat 12th-seeded Jelena Ostapenko 6-3, 6-3 earlier Thursday.

"Seeing her back, it's great," said Kerber, who has lost six of eight previous matches against Williams. "I know that she is always pushing you to the limits."

Kerber let 2017 French Open champion Ostapenko determine the outcome of nearly every point. By the end, Ostapenko had far more winners, 30-10, and far more unforced errors, 36-7.

Williams vs. Kerber will be a rematch of the 2016 final. Williams won that for a second consecutive Wimbledon title, then sat out the grass-court tournament last year while pregnant, part of a 16-month gap between majors.

After giving birth to daughter Olympia last September, Williams was treated for blood clots.

"I lost count after, like, four surgeries," said Williams, who has been wearing compression leggings this fortnight as a precaution.

Her first Grand Slam tournament back was the French Open, where she won three matches before withdrawing last month because of an injured chest muscle.

All of the time away pushed someone who's spent more than 300 weeks ranked No. 1 down the rankings — she began Wimbledon at 181st, but was seeded 25th on account of her past success — and no one could quite be sure how the American would fare over these two weeks.

Not even Williams knew.

"This is not inevitable for me. I had a really tough delivery ... and almost didn't make it, to be honest," Williams said. "I remember I couldn't even walk to my mail box, so it's definitely not 'normal' for me to be in a Wimbledon final."

The victory over Goerges extended Williams' winning streak at Wimbledon to 20 matches, dating to the start of the 2015 edition. She's also won her past 15 Grand Slam matches since the start of the 2017 Australian Open, which she won while pregnant.

That title pushed her past Steffi Graf's record of 22 majors in the half-century professional era; Court won some of her Slams during the amateur era.

Williams' match against Goerges was even until 2-all, 30-all. Until then, Goerges, the first seeded player Williams faced these two weeks, showed she was capable of trading power from the baseline and big serves with Williams.

There were moments when watching Goerges made it easy to wonder how it could be possible she never had been past a major's fourth round until now. Or, more to the point on this afternoon, how such a stinging serve and groundstrokes didn't help her avoid first-round exits each of the past five years at Wimbledon.

But she couldn't keep up with Williams, who grabbed 18 of 22 points and five consecutive games to close the first set and begin the next.

"She brings her 'A game' in a lot of important moments," Goerges said. "We saw that she improved every single match she's playing here."

There was one brief blip to come: Williams got broken for the only time while serving for the match at 5-3. Immediately, though, she broke back at love to end it, placing her left fist on her chest when Goerges' last shot landed long.

Later, Williams was asked whether this has been her most trying comeback in a career that's had its share, including an earlier bout with blood clots in her lungs.

"I don't know if it's been the toughest, because I have Olympia. For me, I only see joy out of it," Williams said with a smile. "In a way, it's by far the toughest, but in a way it's by far the best."


Suwannapura leads after first round at LPGA Marathon Classic

Thidapa Suwannapura laughs as she talks with her caddie before teeing off during the first round of the LPGA Marathon Classic golf tournament, Thursday, July 12, at Highland Meadows Golf Club in Sylvania, Ohio. (Kurt Steiss/The Blade via AP)

Sylvania, Ohio (AP) — For only the second time in her seven-year career, Thidapa Suwannapura took the overnight lead at an LPGA Tour event.

Suwannapura shot a 6-under-par 65 on Thursday at the Marathon Classic and led seven players by one shot. The Thai player grabbed the outright lead with a birdie on the par-5 18th at Highland Meadows — her 10th birdie of the day.

"I'm really happy about the way I played today," she said. "I didn't really look at the leaderboard, and did not even expect anything. I have a chance, so let's see how it goes."

Suwannapura, who has three top-10 finishes in 120 career LPGA Tour starts, last had the overnight lead after the first round of the 2013 Pure Silk-Bahamas LPGA Classic, where she faded in the second round and finished in a tie for 65th.

The 25-year-old Suwannapura's best career finish was seventh at the 2014 Kingsmill Invitational. That was also her last top 10. This season, her best performance was a tie for 18th three weeks ago in Arkansas.

Seven players, including defending champion I.K. Kim and former No. 1 Yani Tseng, were a stroke behind at 66.

Kim, who started her round on the back nine, said conditions were calmer once she made the turn. She birdied five of the final six holes, including the par-4 ninth.

"Not much wind out there. So I took that advantage on the front nine," she said. "I had a good roll, all three birdies in a row. And birdieing the last two par-5's was really fun."

Tseng was the only player in the top eight to have a bogey-free round. She missed an eagle putt on the final hole that would have drawn her even with Suwannapura.

"I stayed patient all day. Just need to get that putting going a little bit," Tseng said. "So today I dropped a few, I missed a few, and this is how golf is. I feel like this is the way I should play."


Yadav and Sharma help India outclass England in 1st ODI

India's Kuldeep Yadav appeals during the One Day International Series cricket match between England and India at Trent Bridge, Nottingham, England, Thursday, July 12. (David Davies/PA via AP)

Nottingham, England (AP) — Kuldeep Yadav and Rohit Sharma spearheaded India as they crushed England by eight wickets in the first one-day international at Trent Bridge on Thursday.

Sharma hit a wonderful 137 not out after Yadav did the damage with the ball with six wickets, helping India win with 10 overs to spare.

Jos Buttler top-scored for England – who have a chance to level the series at Lord's on Saturday - with 53 but they failed to deal with Yadav's spin before toiling in the field.

Yadav claimed 6-25 from 10 overs - including 38 dot balls - as England were outclassed and dismissed for 268 having lost the toss and put into bat.

"We need to get better at playing him," England captain Eoin Morgan said.

"When he does bowl well he is very good and he exposes an area of our game we need to improve on, that is a healthy thing. It's a chance to improve in this area, however long it takes, between now and the World Cup."

Yadav was backed up by the quick-hitting openers before Shikhar Dhawan was caught for 40 after mistiming a slog off Moeen Ali.

But it did little to slow India down as they passed 100 with Sharma and Virat Kohli taking on England. They reached their half-centuries as India cruised to 169-1, needing 100 to win from 25 overs.

The devastating Sharma rattled off a century with a stunning six only after seeing Jason Roy drop an extremely difficult chance when the opener was on 92.

Kohli, though, was stumped by Buttler for 75 off Rashid to end the partnership at 167 but it was only a brief respite for England.

Mark Wood's 0-55 from six overs was costly but Morgan's side failed to post a competitive total.

England, who plundered a record 481 in Nottingham against Australia last month, struggled despite an opening stand of 73.

Yadav took control in a devastating spell, claiming 3-7 from two overs with Jason Roy, Jonny Bairstow and Joe Root all falling.

"Luckily I got three wickets in two overs which changed the momentum," Yadav said.

"I'm enjoying English conditions at the moment. I didn't try anything new, I stuck to the basics and stuck wicket to wicket. I'm hoping for the test call and let's see what happens in a couple of days when they announce the team."

Roy (38) was caught by Umesh Yadav while Bairstow (38) and Root were trapped lbw in the 13th over.

It saw England slip to 82-3 and Morgan (19) walked after bringing up England's 100, giving his wicket away after being caught at midwicket off Yuzvendra Chahal.

From then it was slow going as Ben Stokes took 103 balls to make his fifty and Buttler crept to a half-century as the pair rebuilt the host's innings.

India restricted England to pinching quick runs rather than plundering boundaries - a far cry from when Bairstow and Alex Hales smashed Australia.

And when Kuldeep Yadav returned he had Buttler caught behind for 53 thanks to Mahendra Singh Dhoni's impressive reflexes.


Dumoulin and Bardet lose time at Tour after bikes break

Ireland's Daniel Martin celebrates as he crosses the finish line to win the sixth stage of the Tour de France cycling race in Mur-de-Bretagne Guerledan, France, Thursday, July 12. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena )

Joseph Wilson

Mur de Bretagne, France (AP) — Sometimes in cycling the bike can be the rider's biggest enemy.

Tour de France contenders Tom Dumoulin and Romain Bardet both lost significant time in the overall standings after spokes on their wheels snapped near the uphill end of Stage 6 on Thursday.

Both title hopefuls were left behind by the rest of the top riders as they increased the pace hunting for the win that finally went to Daniel Martin of Ireland.

Dumoulin said his bike broke when he knocked into Bardet near the foot of the second of two two-kilometer ascents up the Mur de Bretagne to the finish line.

"I hit the back wheel of Bardet when there was the movement in the peloton and I couldn't avoid it," the Dutch rider said. "I needed to change wheel and chase to the finish as hard as possible but it was very difficult."

Dumoulin and his Sunweb team compounded the mechanical mishap by getting a 20-second penalty when Dumoulin stayed too close to the team car while trying to catch the pack, thereby benefiting from its draft that pulled him along.

"I knew I wouldn't make it back so it was about limiting the time loss," Dumoulin said. "I'm disappointed of course, I would have liked to be in a better position on (general classification) but that's how it is."

Dumoulin and Bardet entered the three-week race among the chosen few riders considered strong enough to challenge four-time champion Chris Froome.

Dumoulin, the time trial world champion and 2017 Giro d'Italia winner, started the stage 44 seconds ahead of Froome, but finished just behind him. Froome trails race leader Greg Van Avermaet by 1:02. Dumoulin is one more second behind.

Bardet was already trailing Froome, and after losing 28 seconds is now 1:45 off the leader's pace after he broke his back wheel and had to change bikes with Tony Gallopin.

"Then I had to chase and that effort was fatal. It's never good to lose time," said Bardet, who has finished on the podium in the past two Tours. "There are a lot of twists on the Tour and this time luck was not on our side."

Martin took the win for UAE Emirates after he broke away on the final kilometer, winning the 181-kilometer leg that started in the western port city of Brest in over four hours.

Martin counterattacked when Richie Porte jumped ahead and nobody immediately tried to reel him in.

"I saw the moment. I had really good legs and when I went my legs kept coming and coming," Martin said. "I knew if I could get a gap it would be difficult to close from behind."

Pierre Latour crossed the line second followed by Alejandro Valverde in third.

Van Avermaet, a BMC support rider for Porte, kept the yellow jersey for a third straight day.

Froome's teammate Geraint Thomas moved into second place overall at three seconds behind Van Avermaet after snatching two additional bonus in an intermediate bonus sprint.

Martin was one of several team leaders along with former Tour winner Vincenzo Nibali and two-time runner-up Nairo Quintana who were caught off-guard by an attack by Quick-Step midway through the stage during a straightaway that was exposed to crosswinds.

A group of around 40 riders including Froome opened up a gap of over a minute, but Martin and the rest hustled back.

This was the first summit finish of this Tour. After the relatively flat first nine days, the race will head south and into the Alps and then the Pyrenees Mountains.

Friday's flat 231-kilometer leg from Fougeres to Chartes is the longest stage of this Tour.


Update July 12, 2018

Croatia beat England 2-1, reach World Cup final for 1st time

Croatia's Ivan Perisic scores his side's first goal past England goalkeeper Jordan Pickford during the semifinal match between Croatia and England at the 2018 soccer World Cup in the Luzhniki Stadium in Moscow, Russia, Wednesday, July 11. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein

Ronald Blum

Moscow (AP) — Croatia's legs seemed heavy, burdened by the accumulated toll of consecutive penalty-kick wins needed to get this far. England had gone ahead with a free kick just five minutes in, dominated play and appeared headed to their first World Cup final since 1966.

Then the second half started and it was as if a different Croatian team had replaced the lethargic one.

Ivan Perisic tied the score in the 68th minute, Mario Mandzukic got the go-ahead goal in the 109th and Croatia shocked England with a 2-1 victory Wednesday that advanced a nation of just over 4 million to a World Cup final against France.

"Mentally strong team," midfielder Ivan Rakitic said. "It's just unbelievable to get back in the game in this way."

When the final whistle blew and they knew they were going to their first World Cup final, the Croatians ran to their jumping and cheering fans in their iconic red-and-white checkered jerseys. Croatia joined an exclusive club of 13 nations that advanced to a World Cup final, doing it in a tournament where powers Brazil, Germany, Argentina and Spain made early exits.

"They've had an incredible route to the final. They've shown remarkable character," said England coach Gareth Southgate, who for now will be remembered more for a fashionable waistcoat than ending a half-century of hurt.

France, who won their only title at home in 1998, will have an extra day of rest after beating Belgium 1-0 on Tuesday.

Croatia, coming off 360 intense minutes at soccer's highest level, face their biggest sporting moment since becoming an independent nation in 1991.

"We started slowly, but we've shown our character, just as we did in the previous two knockout rounds when we were one-goal down," Perisic said.

Fans back home in Zagreb took to the streets to celebrate, lighting flares and waving flags in a sea of exuberance.

"We are a nation of people who never give in, who are proud and who have character," said coach Zlatko Dalic, who wore a checkered jersey to his post-match news conference. "There's no weakness in a team that is in the final."

England were not among the top 10 nations in ticket sales before the tournament, but the team's progress caused gallivanting supporters to flock to Moscow.

The front of the stands behind one goal was filled with more than two dozen white banners with a red Cross of St. George, pledging support from many of the island's clubs, from Bradford to Wolverhampton. Back home, a crowd of 30,000 was in London's Hyde Park for a large-screen viewing, the British Beer and Pub Association predicted supporters would buy 10 million extra pints at pubs during the match, and No.1 Court at Wimbledon was less than one-third full for the men's quarterfinal between John Isner and Milos Raonic.

Promise seemed about to be fulfilled when Kieran Trippier curled in a free kick in the fifth minute for his first international goal, above leaping Dejan Lovren and Mandzukic and past the desperate dive of goalkeeper Danijel Subasic. Choruses of "God Save the Queen" began in England's end.

"We had a couple chances after that to get the second, give ourselves a bit more breathing room," England captain Harry Kane said.

Football will not be coming home to England, and there will be no title to match the 1966 triumph at Wembley Stadium. Kane & Co. will deal with the same disappointment that felled Shearer and Platt, Gazza and Wazza, Beckham and Gerrard. And Southgate, whose penalty-kick failure led to England's previous semifinal loss in a major tournament, in the 1996 European Championship semifinals.

"Impossible to say anything to them that is going to make them feel better at this point," Southgate said after England's fourth straight loss in a major tournament semifinal.

Croatia tied the score after Rakitic switched the ball from left flank to right, where Vrsaljko crossed. Kyle Walker attempted a diving header to clear. Perisic jumped and from behind raised his left boot over Walker's head to poke the ball past goalkeeper Jordan Pickford from about 8 yards for his fourth World Cup goal, including two in this tournament.

Mandzukic scored after Walker stuck out a leg to block Josip Pivaric's cross. The ball popped up, and Perisic outjumped Trippier to head the ball toward goal. Mandzukic alertly reacted to the unexpected ball in the penalty area, splitting defenders Stones and Harry Maguire, who both had taken four short steps up. The ball bounced twice, Mandzukic ran onto it and one-timed a low, left-footed shot to Pickford's left.

"Three times 120 minutes and fresher legs today than the English team," Lovren marveled.

Mandzukic ran to a corner and was mobbed by teammates, who jumped on him and trapped photographers under them in the crush.

Not long after, Dalic was thinking about the short recovery time before the final.

"It's our fault. Why didn't we score earlier?" he said. "Why didn't we finish the job in regulation time?"

Rakitic wasn't worried.

"We still have lots of energy in the tank," he said.


Federer stunned in Wimbledon QF; Nadal, Djokovic, Isner win

Switzerland's Roger Federer prepares to leave the court after losing his men's quarterfinals match against Kevin Anderson of South Africa, at the Wimbledon Tennis Championships, in London, Wednesday July 11. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

Howard Fendrich

London (AP) — Roger Federer was a point away from a rather tidy, straight-set victory in the Wimbledon quarterfinals. One lousy point.

And then, slowly, over the next two-plus hours, all the way until the fifth set reached its 24th game, as the temperature dropped and the spectators' cries of "Let's go, Roger!" echoed through the shadows, everything came apart for the eight-time champion. Against an opponent who'd never beaten him nor made it this far at the All England Club.

In a stunning turnaround in an unfamiliar setting — No. 1 Court instead of Centre Court — the top-seeded Federer blew a third-set match point and, eventually, all of his big lead in a 2-6, 6-7 (5), 7-5, 6-4, 13-11 loss to No. 8 Kevin Anderson on Wednesday in a 4-hour, 14-minute tussle.

"It was just one of those days where you hope to get by somehow," said Federer, who last played at No. 1 Court in 2015. "I almost could have. I should have."

While his tournament is over, two of his long-time rivals at the top of tennis set up a semifinal showdown: Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic. Nadal, who's won two of his 17 Grand Slam titles at Wimbledon, edged 2009 U.S. Open champion Juan Martin del Potro 7-5, 6-7 (7), 4-6, 6-4, 6-4 in a wildly entertaining match that featured diving shots by both and lasted 4 hours, 48 minutes.

Djokovic, whose 12 major championships include three from the All England Club, got to his first Grand Slam semifinal since 2016 by beating No. 24 seed Kei Nishikori  6-3, 3-6, 6-2, 6-2.

In Friday's other men's match, Anderson will face No. 9 John Isner, the 33-year-old American who reached his first major semifinal in his 41st try by eliminating 2016 runner-up Milos Raonic 6-7 (5), 7-6 (7), 6-4, 6-3. Isner hit 25 aces, saved the only break point he faced, and has won all 95 of his service games in the tournament.

Federer hadn't been broken until facing Anderson. Still, the 20-time major champion was leading by two sets and 5-4 in the third when, with Anderson serving, he got to Ad-Out. He could have ended things right then and there. Federer managed to return a 134 mph serve, but on his next stroke, he shanked a backhand.

Back to deuce. From there, it all began to change. Anderson held for 5-all, broke to 6-5 with a violent return winner off a 97 mph second serve, then staved off three break points and closed the set with a 133 mph ace.

The comeback was just beginning.

"I had my chances," Federer said, "so it's disappointing."

This was only the third time in Federer's 20 years of contesting Grand Slam matches that he lost after taking the opening two sets; both of the other defeats came in 2011. And, according to the ATP, it's the fifth time Federer lost a match at a major after holding a match point, something else that last happened seven years ago.

How hard was it to see this coming?

First of all, Federer was 4-0 against Anderson, winning every set. But there was more. So much more. Federer was attempting to reach his 13th semifinal at Wimbledon and move closer to title No. 9, both of which would have broken his own records.

He came into the match having won 32 consecutive sets at Wimbledon, a run he stretched to 34 before faltering.

"I just kept on telling myself, 'I have to keep believing.' I kept saying that today was going to be my day," Anderson said, "because you really need that mindset taking the court against somebody like Roger."

Anderson was the runner-up to Nadal at last year's U.S. Open, but he never made it beyond the fourth round at Wimbledon until this week. He hit 28 aces against Federer, saved nine of 12 break points and managed to hold his own in the rare lengthy baseline rallies.

"It's like that with the big servers," Federer said. "You're never really safe."

As the fifth set became as much a test of mental strength as anything, from 4-all to 6-all to 8-all to 10-all, Anderson stayed steady. It was Federer who blinked, double-faulting to face a break point at 11-all, then slapping a forehand into the net.

Anderson, a 32-year-old South African who played college tennis at Illinois, served it out, ending things with a 128 mph service winner before raising both arms.

Djokovic got his wish to play in the main stadium, and he showed that he might completely be back from right elbow troubles that lasted more than a year until he finally had surgery in February.

He's been flashing some anger this fortnight and did so again in the second set, bouncing his racket off the turf after failing to capitalize on three break points at 1-all. That earned a code violation from chair umpire Carlos Ramos. When Nishikori let his own racket fly in the fourth set, he wasn't chastised, which prompted Djokovic to yell "double standards" toward Ramos — drawing boos from fans.

"He claims that he didn't see what Nishikori has done, but apparently he always sees what I do," Djokovic said afterward, "something that I don't think is fair."

Later, Ramos warned Djokovic for a time violation, but that didn't seem to faze the Serb.

Soon enough, Djokovic was on his way to the semifinals, where he will meet Nadal.

"I like the level of tennis that I'm playing on right now. I really do. I think with the performances I've had, I deserve to be in the semifinals," said Djokovic, whose last major title came at the 2016 French Open. "I don't want to stop here. I hope I can get a chance to fight for a trophy."

He'll have to get past Nadal first.


NFL players union files grievance over anthem policy

San Francisco 49ers players kneel during the national anthem before an NFL football game in this Dec. 24, 2017, file photo. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

New York (AP) — The NFL Players Association filed a grievance with the league on Tuesday challenging its national anthem policy.

The union says that the new policy, which the league imposed without consultation with the NFLPA, is inconsistent with the collective bargaining agreement and infringes on players' rights. The filing met a statute of limitations deadline and will be heard by an independent arbitrator, an NFLPA spokesman said.

In May, the NFL approved its national anthem policy at its owners meetings in Atlanta. The policy allows players to protest during the national anthem by staying in the locker room, but forbids them from sitting or taking a knee if they're on the field or the sidelines.

Teams will be subject to fines if players don't comply and will have the option of punishing players.

When the league announced the policy, Commissioner Roger Goodell called it a compromise aimed at putting the focus back on football after a tumultuous year in which television ratings dipped nearly 10 percent; some blamed the protests for such a drop. The union said at that time that it would file a grievance against any change in the collective bargaining agreement.

The union said Tuesday it has proposed having its executive committee talking to the NFL instead of proceeding with litigation. The union said the NFL has agreed to those discussions.

The NFL declined to comment about the union's action.

In 2016, then-49ers quarterback, Colin Kaepernick began protesting police brutality and social injustice by kneeling during the national anthem, and the demonstration spread to other players and teams. It became one of the most controversial and sensitive issues in the NFL, with players saying their messages last year were being misconstrued, while others — including President Donald Trump — called them unpatriotic. Trump even said NFL owners should fire any player who refused to stand during the anthem.

Following those comments, more than 200 players protested during the anthem that weekend before the number of protesters dwindled as the season progressed.

"We're here for a bigger platform," Raiders tight end Jared Cook said during the spring. "We're not just athletes. We're people that live this. It's people in our neighborhood, it's people that we grew up with, it's people that we know who are actually living through these circumstances. So when we speak on it, it's not like we're just speaking out of the side of our neck. It's things that actually touch home and things that we can actually relate to.

"All I have to say is, I just think it's sad that it's veered from something that stood for good and the whole narrative has changed into something that's negative when that was not what it was initially about in the first place."

The NFL started requiring players to be on the field for the anthem in 2009 — the year it signed a marketing deal with the military.

"We want people to be respectful of the national anthem. We want people to stand," Goodell said at the May meetings, when he dismissed concerns about the lack of union involvement by contending the league met with countless players over the past year.

"We've been very sensitive on making sure that we give players choices," the commissioner added, "but we do believe that moment is an important moment and one that we are going to focus on."

The league and the Players Coalition have been working in tandem on efforts to support player initiatives in the community and for a variety of social issues. The NFL is committing $90 million over the next seven years to social justice causes in a three-segment plan that involves league players.


Billie Jean King among athletes opposing IAAF hormone policy

Former tennis star Billie Jean King. (AP Photo/Mark Baker)

New York (AP) — Billie Jean King is among more than 60 athletes urging international track and field's governing body to rescind its new standard on natural hormone levels for female runners.

The tennis great joined the athletes in an open letter asking the IAAF to end its policy passed in April that limits testosterone levels for middle-distance runners. Two sports groups — the Women's Sports Foundation and Athlete Ally — released the letter Tuesday.

Soccer's Megan Rapinoe, hockey's Meghan Duggan and softball's Jessica Mendoza are among the signees. They say the standard discriminates against female athletes and "no woman should be required to change her body" to compete in sports.

World and Olympic 800-meter champion Caster Semenya recently challenged the policy before the Court of Arbitration for Sport. The policy requires women to take birth control pills to lower testosterone levels and is to take effect Nov. 1.

Rapinoe pointed to the wingspan of swimmer Michael Phelps and height of basketball player Yao Ming.

"This is just another way in which sport governing bodies police dominant female athletes — but never our male counterparts," she said.


Update July 11, 2018

Superb defence takes France through to World Cup final

France's Samuel Umtiti celebrates after scoring his side’s winning goal against Belgium at the 2018 soccer World Cup in St. Petersburg, Russia, Tuesday, July 10. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

Jerome Pugmire

St. Petersburg, Russia (AP) — France's defence made the difference — on both sides of the field.

Goalkeeper Hugo Lloris kept out the shots and defender Samuel Umtiti scored the winning goal from a corner.

It was France's backline, not their slick attackers, that carried the team to the World Cup final with a 1-0 victory over Belgium on Tuesday.

"This is why football is magical, it gives everyone emotions. It's tough not to give into euphoria, but it's a fantastic moment," Lloris said. "We feared them on set pieces, but in the end it was us scoring from one."

France coach Didier Deschamps fell into Umtiti's arms after the final whistle. His superbly drilled defence, led by Raphael Varane, neutralized Belgium's much-hyped attack to record a fourth shutout in six games so far.

"They have so many athletic players, to have resisted in defence is very good. We had to defend very deep sometimes," Deschamps said. "We came up against a very good Belgium side which controlled the game more than us. But we also hurt them."

Umtiti danced in front of the French fans, while center back partner Varane walked over to them and pumped his clenched fist. Varane was injured when France lost the European Championship final two years ago, and he looks determined to make up for it.

The spotlight has been on 19-year-old sensation Kylian Mbappe in Russia, whose electric pace and skill lit up the tournament. But for the second consecutive knockout game, a defender managed to score when Mbappe couldn't.

Against Uruguay last Friday, it was Varane's header that gave France the lead in a 2-0 win. A few days later, it was Umtiti rising to head home a corner from the right in the 51st minute.

"Enormously proud," Umtiti said. "We worked really hard together, and it's me that scored but we all delivered a big game."

Umtiti showed superb timing to leap above Belgium midfielder Maroune Fellaini — the tallest non-goalkeeper on either side — and power a header past Thibaut Courtois.

"When you're not particularly tall you need determination and the will to get in front of the opponent," Umtiti said. "The set piece was really well taken as well, and that helped me beat someone as good as Fellaini in the air."

Forward Antoine Griezmann set up Umtiti's and Varane's headed goals with his cushioned delivery from set pieces. But like Mbappe, he took a back seat against the Belgians as Lloris and his defence starred at the St. Petersburg Stadium.

Varane made decisive headers to cut out dangerous crosses and corners, and read to perfection almost every run from Romelu Lukaku and the fleet-footed Eden Hazard. He also compensated for the times when right back Benjamin Pavard was caught out of position, particularly by Hazard, when Belgium dominated the opening 20 minutes.

When France's defence was breached, the agile Lloris was on hand to make decisive saves — just like against Uruguay. He made a superb, leaping stop to his right to palm away a sudden strike from Toby Alderweireld in the 22nd minute that would have gone inside the left post.

Midway through the second half, Lloris was there again, springing off his line to punch away a dangerous right-wing cross from Belgium substitute Dries Mertens.

With 10 minutes left and Belgium pressing, Lloris flew off his line to his left to push away a powerful shot from midfielder Axel Witsel.

France won their only World Cup 20 years ago, thanks to a commanding goalkeeper — Fabien Barthez — protected by a rock-solid defence which also chipped in with goals.

In 1998, a defender — Laurent Blanc — scored in the first knockout game to defeat Paraguay in extra time; and Barthez saved France in a tense penalty shootout against Italy in the quarterfinals. Then, right back Lilian Thuram scored the only two goals of his career to help France beat Croatia in the semifinals.

France kept five shutouts in seven games back then. With Croatia or England awaiting in Sunday's final, the formula is one game away from working again.


Ronaldo leaving Real Madrid to join Italian club Juventus

In this Saturday, May 26, 2018 file photo Real Madrid's Cristiano Ronaldo celebrates with the Champions League trophy at the Olimpiyskiy Stadium in Kiev, Ukraine. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)

Daniella Matar

Madrid (AP) - Cristiano Ronaldo is leaving Real Madrid to join Italian club Juventus in a move expected to benefit the Portugal forward's tax return.

Juventus said Tuesday it is paying 112 million euros for Ronaldo, who will sign a four-year deal with the Serie A champions.

The move brings an end to a hugely successful nine-year spell in Spain, and takes him further away from a tax fraud case that may end up costing the Portugal forward more than $20 million in fines.

"These years with Real Madrid and in this city of Madrid have been possibly the happiest of my life," Ronaldo wrote in an open letter. "My only feeling is of an enormous gratitude for this club, for these fans and for this city. I can only thank them all for the love and affection I have received.

"But I think the time has come to start a new phase in my life and that is why I have asked the club to accept my transfer. I feel that it is time, and I ask everyone, especially our fans, to please understand me."

Ronaldo joined Real Madrid in 2009 from Manchester United and is the Spanish club's all-time leading scorer with 451 goals in 438 matches. He helped the club win four Champions League titles — beating Juventus in the final in 2017 — and also won the league and cup twice each.

He has scored a record 120 Champions League goals, 105 of them since moving to Madrid — 12 more than Juventus managed in that same period.

But he was unhappy with the way the tax authorities treated him in Spain. Ronaldo, along with several other top players in the country, has been accused of tax fraud, with authorities saying the government was defrauded of 14.7 million euros from 2011-14. Unconfirmed media reports last month said Ronaldo had agreed to pay a fine of 18.8 million euros.

In Italy, a new law caps tax on income generated from abroad at 100,000 euros per year for residents who have paid their taxes in other countries for at least nine of the last 10 years.

Other players targeted by Spanish tax authorities in recent years include Lionel Messi, Javier Mascherano and Luka Modric. Former Real Madrid coach Jose Mourinho, now at Manchester United, was also investigated.

Ronaldo is currently on vacation in Greece following Portugal's elimination from the World Cup. Juventus president Andrea Agnelli flew out Tuesday to meet the 33-year-old forward.

"Real Madrid wants to express its gratitude to a player who has proven to be the best in the world and who has marked one of the greatest eras in the history of our club and of world soccer," Real Madrid said in a statement.

"In addition to the titles he won, Cristiano Ronaldo has been an example of dedication, work, responsibility, talent and determination," Madrid added. "For Real Madrid, Cristiano Ronaldo will always be one of its greatest symbols and a unique reference for the next generations. Real Madrid will always be his home."

Ronaldo signed a five-year deal with Madrid in 2016, saying he wanted to end his career at the club. But he has also publicly expressed his discontentment about being jeered at times by some Madrid fans at the Santiago Bernabeu Stadium.

Ronaldo was also moved by the Juventus fans for giving him a standing ovation after he scored a spectacular goal against the Italian club at the Allianz Stadium in the Champions League quarterfinals last season.

"I gave a lot of thought to this and I know that the time has come for a new era," Ronaldo said. "I'm leaving, but this jersey, this shield and the Santiago Bernabeu will always feel as something that is mine wherever I go."

The signing breaks the Serie A record, which Juventus set two years ago when they paid Napoli 90 million euros for Gonzalo Higuain.

Ronaldo made his debut for Sporting Lisbon when he was 17. His crossover dribble was already famous when Alex Ferguson brought him to Manchester United ahead of the 2003-04 season and gave him the No. 7 shirt of the recently departed David Beckham.

He spent six seasons in England, winning three Premier League titles, one Champions League title and one FA Cup.

Ronaldo led Portugal to their first major title at the European Championship two years ago in France. He helped the Portuguese team reach the semifinals in his first World Cup in 2006.

Portugal were eliminated by Uruguay in the round of 16 of this year's tournament in Russia. Ronaldo scored four goals to take his tally to 85 for his country and break Ferenc Puskas' record as Europe's all-time leading international scorer.


Serena Williams reaches Wimbledon semis

Serena Williams of the United States celebrates winning her women's singles quarterfinal match against Italy's Camila Giorgi, at the Wimbledon Tennis Championships, in London, Tuesday July 10. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

Howard Fendrich

London (AP) — There are moments in which nothing at all seems different about Serena Williams, moments such as when she unleashed a 109 mph service winner to even her Wimbledon quarterfinal at a set apiece, leaned forward and yelled, loudly as can be, "Cooome ooon!"

Or when, about 10 minutes later, she stretched for a lunging backhand winner to break at love and take control of the third set, then raised a fist, figuring a berth in her 11th semifinal at the All England Club was close at hand.

And after Williams came up with a comeback to beat 52nd-ranked Camila Giorgi of Italy 3-6, 6-3, 6-4 on Tuesday, she headed off Centre Court with her right index finger aloft. Yes, no matter what the rankings or seedings say, no matter how long she was away, Williams still looks capable of playing like someone who's No. 1, just about 10 months after having a baby.

"Everything right now is a little bit of a surprise. To be here. To be in the semifinals. I mean, I always say I plan on it, I would like to be there, have these goals," Williams said. "But when it actually happens, it still is, like, 'Wow, this is really happening.'"

So what if she's still getting her game in gear?

So what if Giorgi wouldn't seem to miss while moving out to that early lead?

Williams never was worried about losing.

"It's weird. Sometimes I feel, 'Man, I'm in trouble.' Sometimes I feel, 'I can fight.' For whatever reason, today I was so calm," said 36-year-old American, who has been wearing compression leggings as a precaution after a blood-clot scare following her daughter's birth. "Even when I was down the first set, I thought, 'Well, she's playing great. I'm doing a lot of the right things.'"

Asked whether that might represent a new way of looking at things, Williams smiled.

"No. Just to be clear, that was just today. I mean, I'm hoping this is, like, a new thing," she said. "Honestly, I highly doubt it."

Next up for Williams as she tries to earn her eighth title at the All England Club and 24th Grand Slam trophy overall will be a match Thursday against No. 13 seed Julia Goerges of Germany, a 3-6, 7-5, 6-1 winner against No. 20 Kiki Bertens of the Netherlands.

"It's pretty unreal for me," said Goerges, who reached her first major semifinal at a tournament where she exited in the first round each of the past five years.

The other semifinal is No. 11 seed Angelique Kerber of Germany vs. No. 12 Jelena Ostapenko of Latvia.

Kerber is a former No. 1 who owns two Grand Slam titles and was the runner-up to Williams at Wimbledon two years ago. Ostapenko won last year's French Open.

Kerber needed seven match points to close out No. 14 Daria Kasatkina of Russia 6-3, 7-5 at Centre Court, while Ostapenko defeated 2014 Australian Open runner-up Dominika Cibulkova of Slovakia 7-5, 6-4 at a windy No. 1 Court.

After a series of upsets made this edition of Wimbledon the first since it began seeding players in the 1920s that none of the top 10 women reached the quarterfinals, Nos. 11, 12 and 13 are still around. And so is No. 25, Williams.

The All England Club seeded her there as a nod to all of her past success at the grass-court major, including titles the last two times she entered, in 2015 and 2016. She missed Wimbledon a year ago because she was pregnant, going about 16 months between Grand Slam tournaments, so her ranking is just outside the top 180.

That is going to change now.

Told she is guaranteed of rising to 51st next week — and higher if she reaches the final or wins the championship — Williams joked: "Got to keep trekking on, though. Serena Williams, 51? Eh, it doesn't have that same ring to it. The '1' part does, but not the '5.'"

Williams is 3-0 against Goerges, winning in straight sets each time.

"Every match starts from zero," Goerges said. "Everybody has the same chances to win that match, and I'm looking forward to it."

After their most recent meeting, in the French Open's third round last month, Williams pulled out of that tournament, citing a chest muscle injury that made it too painful to serve.

She went a couple of weeks without practicing serves, and the rest did wonders. She hit one at 122 mph against Giorgi, delivered six of her seven aces in the final set, and won 44 of the last 54 points she served.

"I messed up too much on my returns," said Giorgi, questioning her decision to stand inside the baseline to receive serve.

Rare is the player who can produce Williams' sort of pace on serves — Giorgi's average speeds were actually faster on first and second serves, and she delivered the match's first three aces — and mirror her power in groundstroke exchanges at the baseline.

But Giorgi plays with nary a trace of subtlety and more than a bit of abandon, taking risky, flat chops at the ball with serves, returns, forehands and backhands. She harbors no compunction about striving for a point-ending winner with every stroke. When she's calibrating properly, it all can be tough for opponents to handle.

Even Williams.

Well, for a set, anyway.


Gaviria beats Sagan again to claim 2nd Tour win on Stage 4

Colombia's Fernando Gaviria, center, sprints to win the fourth stage of the Tour de France cycling race in Sarzeau, France, Tuesday, July 10. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)

Joseph Wilson

Sarzeau, France (AP) — Fernando Gaviria and Peter Sagan have turned the first four days of the Tour de France into an enthralling duel of rising star versus world champion.

And Tour newcomer Gaviria is winning so far.

Gaviria edged Sagan at the finish line to claim Stage 4 on Tuesday and take his second stage win in his first participation at cycling's greatest race.

The 23-year-old Colombian had already bettered Sagan in a sprint to take the opening stage, amid rising expectations since his four stage victories at last year's Giro d'Italia.

Sagan hit back by winning Stage 2 in an uphill sprint after Gaviria had fallen in a group pileup on the final corner.

Tuesday's flat leg with its four-kilometer finish — the longest straightaway to conclude a leg on this Tour— was perfect terrain for the budding rivals to break the tie.

After Quick-Step hunted down the breakaway to set up Gaviria, he powered ahead of the pack with handlebars swinging and crossed just inches ahead of Sagan and Andre Greipel in a close third.

Sagan was closing fast and seemed to be on pace to overtake him just when Gaviria hit the line.

"He is faster than me," said Sagan, the three-time defending world champion who excels in finishes on slight ascents.

"We will see. Maybe I will wait for some mistake (to beat him). And maybe we will see the next days on the climbs. Every stage is different, every sprint is different."

Gaviria finished the 195-kilometer leg from La Baule to Sarzeau that started and finished on the Atlantic coast in 4 hours, 25 minutes, 1 second.

"It was a very difficult sprint, but we knew how to pull it off," Gaviria said. "We didn't receive any help from the other teams to bring the breakaway back, but at the end my team deserves this victory and we can go to the hotel very happy with what we achieved."

Defending champion Chris Froome of Sky, who remained 55 seconds back due to his fall in Stage 1, finished safely in the pack with leader Greg Van Avermaet.

Riders were enjoying a calm sunny afternoon until a pileup near the front of the peloton with just over 5K left that sent several riders to the tarmac.

But there were no changes among the title hopefuls.

Van Avermaet, the 2016 Olympic road race champion who is support rider for BMC leader Richie Porte, took the yellow jersey when his team won Monday's team time trial.

Tom Dumoulin was seventh (11 seconds behind), last year's runner-up Rigoberto Uran was 10th (:35) and Porte 14th (:51). Movistar teammates Alejandro Valverde and Mikel Landa were 15th and 16th (:53), narrowly ahead of Froome. The 2014 champion Vincenzo Nibali was 19th (1:06), Romain Bardet 20th (1:15) and Nairo Quintana was 48th (2:08).

A four-man breakaway opened up a gap of more than seven minutes early on, but they were slowly reeled in by the Quick-Step-led pack with 2 kilometers to go.

The Tour will spend three more days in northeastern Brittany, where fans waved black-and-white striped Breton flag on the roadside as the peloton rolled through the country villages.

Next up is Stage 5, a hilly 204.5-kilometer leg from Lorient to Quimper.

"Tomorrow is going to be a hard stage. It is a mini-classic in the Tour," said Van Avermaet.

The Tour works its way east before hitting the feared cobblestones of Stage 9 and then heading south and into the mountains.
 


DAILY UPDATE

|

Back to Main Page

HEADLINES [click on headline to view story]

France beat Croatia 4-2 to win 2nd FIFA World Cup

Djokovic wins 4th Wimbledon by beating Anderson in 3 sets

Pacquiao wins 60th career fight with seventh-round knockout

Suwannapura gets first LPGA Tour win at Marathon Classic

Degenkolb masters cobblestones as Porte crashes out of Tour


Anderson tops Isner 26-24 at Wimbledon; other SF suspended

Karunaratne leads Sri Lanka to 272-run lead 2 days into test

Pacquiao, Matthysse make weight for welterweight title fight

Chelsea fire manager Antonio Conte after 2 years in charge


Serena Williams nears 8th Wimbledon title, 24th Slam overall

Suwannapura leads after first round at LPGA Marathon Classic

Yadav and Sharma help India outclass England in 1st ODI

Dumoulin and Bardet lose time at Tour after bikes break


Croatia beat England 2-1, reach World Cup final for 1st time

Federer stunned in Wimbledon QF; Nadal, Djokovic, Isner win

NFL players union files grievance over anthem policy

Billie Jean King among athletes opposing IAAF hormone policy


Superb defence takes France through to World Cup final

Ronaldo leaving Real Madrid to join Italian club Juventus

Serena Williams reaches Wimbledon semis

Gaviria beats Sagan again to claim 2nd Tour win on Stage 4

 



Chiangmai Mail Publishing Co. Ltd.
189/22 Moo 5, T. Sansai Noi, A. Sansai, Chiang Mai 50210
THAILAND
Tel. 053 852 557, Fax. 053 014 195
Editor: 087 184 8508
E-mail: [email protected]
www.chiangmai-mail.com
Administration: [email protected]
Website & Newsletter Advertising: [email protected]

Copyright © 2004 Chiangmai Mail. All rights reserved.
This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.