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Update May 2017


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Update May 31, 2017

Risky retrieval of Everest bodies raises climbers' concern

In this May 28, 2017 file photo, the bodies of Indian climbers, that were retrieved from Mount Everest by a rescue team of eight sherpas, lay on the ground in Kathmandu, Nepal.(AP Photo/Niranjan Shrestha, File)

Binaj Gurubacharya,Associated Press

KATHMANDU, Nepal (AP) — The Indian man wept as a helicopter landed in Nepal's capital carrying the body of his brother, one of hundreds of climbers who have died while attempting to climb Mount Everest.

The body had been left on the mountain for a year until last week, when a team of Sherpa climbers managed to recover it along with two others. But the high-risk expedition, financed with about $92,000 from the Indian state of West Bengal, has sparked heated debate in the mountaineering community about the morality of risking more lives to retrieve bodies from one of the most unforgiving places on Earth.

"It was a very dangerous operation," West Bengal state official Sayeed Ahmed Baba acknowledged. "It was difficult to find Sherpas who were willing to go. But we had to do it for the families."

On the helipad Sunday in Kathmandu, Debashish Ghosh felt relief as he watched the Indian team unload the three bodies from the back of the chopper.

"We are finally able to bring him home," he said of his brother, Gautam. "After we cremate the body there will be peace for his soul and relief to our family."

Many in the mountaineering community said that peace of mind came with unacceptable risk. Climbers who attempt to scale the world's tallest mountain know they could die from any number of challenges, including low oxygen, frigid temperatures, strong winds and steep falls. Asking others to carry down the bodies — often much heavier because they are frozen and covered in ice — puts more people in danger, they said.

"It is just not worth the risk," said Ang Tshering of the Nepal Mountaineering Association. "To get one body off of the mountain, they are risking the lives of 10 more people."

About 300 climbers have died since Everest was first conquered in 1953, and at least 100 — maybe 200 — corpses remain on the mountain. Most are hidden in deep crevasses or covered by snow and ice, but some are visible and have become macabre landmarks, earning nicknames for their plastic climbing boots, colorful parkas or final resting poses.

The most difficult bodies to retrieve are near the 8,850-meter (29,035-foot) summit in the low-oxygen area known by mountaineers as the death zone.

That is where the body of Gautam Ghosh was found last week along with the body of another Indian climber, Ravi Kumar, who died earlier in May after falling from the route on his way down from the summit. A third Indian man who died last year was recovered from the nearby South Col, the last camp at 8,000 meters (26,240 feet) before climbers make their final push for the summit.

Once the team of eight Sherpas reached the bodies, they had to break them from the surrounding ice, wrap them and tie them with ropes and slowly drag them down in high winds to Camp 2, a rocky expanse at 6,400 meters (21,000 feet) that is the highest helicopters can reach.

Expedition leader Eric Murphy, who last week guided his clients to the summit, criticized the retrieval and said he wouldn't want anyone to risk their own life to bring his body down if he died on the mountain.

"It is a sacred place and a good place to rest," Murphy said. "I would really question whether it is appropriate to risk so many to bring down one who is already lost."

It is often Sherpas who are hired for retrieval expeditions. Climbers from the ethnic group that has lived for centuries around Everest have become an integral part of the Himalayan mountaineering world, and rely on the pay they can earn during the three-month climbing season to carry their families through the year.

Despite the danger of bringing down bodies, climbers are often asked to do so by the families of those who die, said Dan Richards of Global Rescue, a Boston-based agency specializing in mountain rescue.

Of the six people who died on Everest this year, only the body of an American doctor was left on the mountain.

"It becomes much more dangerous than simply climbing if you're attempting to recover and transport a heavy load," Richards said. A recovery team faces the same risks as climbers, including altitude sickness, edema, frostbite, hypothermia as well as accidents and avalanches.

But some believe the dangerous effort is still worth it.

"It is always better to bring down the bodies, which also leaves the mountain cleaner," said veteran mountaineer Reinhold Messner, who was the first to scale Everest without bottled oxygen and climb the world's 14 highest peaks.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Men probing Ivanka Trump brands in China arrested, missing

 

Hua Haifeng is seen during a visit to a park in Chengde in central China's Hubei province.

Erika Kinetz, Associated Press

SHANGHAI (AP) — A man investigating working conditions at a Chinese company that produces Ivanka Trump-brand shoes has been arrested and two others are missing, the arrested man's wife and an advocacy group said Tuesday.

Hua Haifeng was accused of illegal surveillance, according to his wife, Deng Guilian, who said the police called her Tuesday afternoon. Deng said the caller told her she didn't need to know the details, only that she would not be able to see, speak with or receive money from her husband, the family's breadwinner.

China Labor Watch Executive Director Li Qiang said he lost contact with Hua Haifeng and the other two men, Li Zhao and Su Heng, over the weekend. By Tuesday, after dozens of unanswered calls, he had concluded: "They must be held either by the factory or the police to be unreachable."

China Labor Watch, a New York-based nonprofit, was planning to publish a report next month alleging low pay, excessive overtime and the possible misuse of student interns. It is unclear whether the undercover investigative methods used by the advocacy group are legal in China.

For 17 years, China Labor Watch has investigated working conditions at suppliers to some of the world's best-known companies, but Li said his work has never before attracted this level of scrutiny from China's state security apparatus.

"Our plan was to investigate the factory to improve the labor situation," Li said. "But now it has become more political."

Walt Disney Co. stopped working with a toy maker in Shenzhen last year after the group exposed labor violations. China Labor Watch has also published reports on child labor at Samsung suppliers and spent years investigating Apple Inc.'s China factories. In the past, the worst thing Li feared was having investigators kicked out of a factory or facing a short police detention.

That has changed.

The arrest and disappearances come amid a crackdown on perceived threats to the stability of China's ruling Communist Party, particularly from sources with foreign ties such as China Labor Watch. Faced with rising labor unrest and a slowing economy, Beijing has also taken a stern approach to activism in southern China's manufacturing belt and to human rights advocates generally, sparking a wave of critical reports about disappearances, public confessions, forced repatriation and torture in custody.

Another difference is the target of China Labor Watch's investigation: a brand owned by the daughter of the president of the United States.

White House spokeswoman Hope Hicks referred questions to Ivanka Trump's brand. The Ivanka Trump brand declined to comment for this story.

Abigail Klem, who took over day-to-day management when the first daughter took on a White House role as presidential adviser, has said the brand requires licensees and their manufacturers to "comply with all applicable laws and to maintain acceptable working conditions."

Li said China Labor Watch asked police about the three missing investigators on Monday but received no reply. Li added that a friend had tried to file a missing person report on Li Zhao in Jiangxi, where the factory is located, but was told he had to do so in the man's hometown.

AP was unable to reach the other investigators' families. China's Ministry of Public Security and police in Ganzhou city and Jiangxi province could not be reached for comment Tuesday, which was a national holiday in China.

All three men were investigating Ganzhou Huajian International Shoe City Co.'s factory in Jiangxi province, just north of Guangdong province. Su Heng had been working undercover at the factory since April, Li said. The parent company is known as Huajian Group.

In January, Liu Shiyuan, then spokesman for the Huajian Group, told AP the company makes 10,000 to 20,000 pairs of shoes a year for Ivanka Trump's brand — a fraction of the 20 million pairs the company produces a year. A current spokeswoman for the company, Long Shan, did not reply to questions Tuesday. "I told you I could not check until tomorrow," she said. "If your official letter contains a stamp and signature, we can confirm whether the media is real or not."

Li said investigators had seen Ivanka Trump-brand shoes in the factory, as well as production orders for Ivanka Trump, Marc Fisher, Nine West and Easy Spirit merchandise.

"We were unaware of the allegations and will look into them immediately," a spokeswoman for Marc Fisher, which manufactures Ivanka Trump, Easy Spirit and its own branded shoes, said in an email. Nine West did not respond to requests for comment.

Li Zhao and Hua Haifeng were blocked from leaving mainland China for Hong Kong in April and May — something that had never happened to his colleagues before, Li said. Hua Haifeng was stopped at the border May 25 and later questioned by police, Li said. During their final phone conversation on Saturday, Hua told Li that police had asked him to stop investigating the Huajian factory — another turn of events that Li said was unprecedented.

Li said the men had documented excessive overtime, with working days sometimes stretching longer than 18 hours, and a base salary below minimum wage. They were working to confirm evidence suggesting that student interns — some of whom allegedly quit in protest — were putting in excessive hours on work unrelated to their field of study, in violation of Chinese law, Li said. The use of student workers in China is legal, but meant to be strictly regulated. Rights groups and journalists have documented widespread abuse of the system over the years.

"It is the role of the police to prevent that kind of independent investigation," said Nicholas Bequelin, East Asia director for Amnesty International. "The threshold is much lower today than it was one year ago, two years ago, and if this is something that has a foreign diplomacy dimension, that would make national security personnel even more willing to stop it."

Hua's wife, Deng, meanwhile, has yet to tell the couple's children, ages 3 and 7, about their father's plight. But they seem to know anyway, she said.

"My son suddenly burst into tears. He said he missed Papa," Deng said by phone from her home in central China's Hubei province. "I said Papa would come home soon and buy you toys."

She said the child looked at her and answered: "Papa was taken away by a monster."

Associated Press researcher Fu Ting contributed from Shanghai.

Follow Kinetz on Twitter at twitter.com/ekinetz

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Australian girl on vacation killed in Baghdad car bomb blast

 This photo published on the front page of the Monday, May 9, 2017, edition of "The Australian" newspaper shows says a 6-year-old Australian boy making an Islamic State movement salute in front of a human body hanging from a cross somewhere in the Middle East, in Canberra.(AP Photo/Rod McGuirk)

Rod McGuirk, Associated Press

CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — The death of an Australian girl in a Baghdad bombing underscored why Australia was fighting Islamic State militants in the Middle East, the Australian foreign minister said on Wednesday.

Zynab Al-Harbiya, 12, from Melbourne, went with her family to Baghdad to visit her sick grandfather but was among the 17 people killed Monday when a car bomb exploded outside a popular ice cream shop, Foreign Minister Julie Bishop said.

The Islamic State militant group claimed responsibility for the attack, which Iraqi officials said involved apparently remotely detonated explosives inside a parked car.

"This tragedy underscores the brutality of this terrorist organization. It shows no respect for religion, nationality, sovereignty, borders, no respect for humanity," Bishop told reporters.

"This is why the Australian government has continued to commit our defense personnel to support the Iraqi security forces, so that they can fight to defeat this terrorist organization within Iraq and to prevent its spread to other parts of the world including in our region," she added.

The girl's cousin, Layla Al-Saabary, told Australian Broadcasting Corp. that Zynab's mother and uncles were among the dozens injured. Al-Saabary did not say how many uncles.

"She wanted to go and buy ice cream, so she insisted. Her mother gave permission and so they went to the main square and she was going to go buy ice cream and she went and she never came back," Al-Saabary said.

The family had only been in Baghdad for a few days when the tragedy occurred and Zynab had been "scared of the bombs," her cousin said.

Australia is one of the biggest contributors to the U.S.-led military campaign against Islamic State militants in Iraq and Syria, with 780 Australian military personnel in the Middle East and aircraft including six jet fighters striking Islamic State targets.

Ramadan is often marked by an increase in violence in Iraq.

Last year, a huge truck bombing claimed by IS killed hundreds in a retail district in central Baghdad where people were shopping for clothes ahead of the holiday that marks the end of Ramadan. It was the single deadliest event in Baghdad since Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein was toppled in 2003.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Armed man in custody at Orlando airport; no one hurt

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — An armed man at the Orlando International Airport was taken into custody Tuesday night after a nearly three-hour standoff with police, authorities said.

No one was hurt, but the terrifying situation created confusion and anxiety as travelers posted video and photos online showing police at the airport with their weapons drawn.

"Gunman is in custody. Everyone is safe," Orlando police tweeted shortly after 10 p.m.

Police earlier said no shots were fired.

Glorializ Col๓n Plaza, 20, told the Orlando Sentinel she was just getting off work from Virgin Atlantic airlines when she saw everyone hiding. She got off the elevator and saw the man on the floor near the rental car area. He was screaming, and cops had surrounded him.

"I couldn't make out the words, but he was screaming really loud," she said. "Everyone there told me right before this happened a man said to everyone: 'You're going to need mental therapy after this,' then he pulled out a gun and everyone ran."

Plaza said she didn't hear any gunshots or see anyone injured.

"I saw all the cops with the long rifles and started shaking," she said. "It didn't seem real."

Earlier this year, authorities say an Alaska man killed five people inside a baggage claim area at the Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport.

The incident at the Orlando airport was first reported about 7:24 p.m. Officers responded and cleared the first floor of Terminal A, airport spokeswoman Carolyn Fennell told the Sentinel. The entire terminal was eventually closed.

Images posted on social media showed a heavy police presence in the area and passengers were worried about missing flights. The Florida Highway Patrol tweeted earlier that all roads to the airport were shut down, with "zero exceptions." Orlando police later tweeted that entrances were open but congested.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Today in History - Wednesday, May 31, 2017

The Associated Press

Today is Wednesday, May 31, the 151st day of 2017. There are 214 days left in the year.

Today's Highlight in History:

On May 31, 1977, the Trans-Alaska oil pipeline, three years in the making despite objections from environmentalists and Alaska Natives, was completed. (The first oil began flowing through the pipeline 20 days later; today the pipeline carries an average of 1.8 million barrels of oil a day, according to the Alaska Public Lands Information Centers website.)

On this date:

In 1790, President George Washington signed into law the first U.S. copyright act.

In 1889, some 2,200 people in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, perished when the South Fork Dam collapsed, sending 20 million tons of water rushing through the town.

In 1910, the Union of South Africa was founded.

In 1916, during World War I, British and German fleets fought the naval Battle of Jutland off Denmark; there was no clear-cut victor, although the British suffered heavier losses.

In 1935, movie studio 20th Century Fox was created through a merger of the Fox Film Corp. and Twentieth Century Pictures.

In 1949, former State Department official and accused spy Alger Hiss went on trial in New York, charged with perjury (the jury deadlocked, but Hiss was convicted in a second trial).

In 1961, South Africa became an independent republic as it withdrew from the British Commonwealth.

In 1962, former Nazi official Adolf Eichmann was hanged in Israel a few minutes before midnight for his role in the Holocaust.

In 1970, a magnitude 7.9 earthquake in Peru claimed an estimated 67,000 lives.

In 1985, 88 people were killed, more than 1,000 injured, when 41 tornadoes swept through parts of Pennsylvania, Ohio, New York and Ontario, Canada, during an 8-hour period.

In 1994, the United States announced it was no longer aiming long-range nuclear missiles at targets in the former Soviet Union.

In 2005, breaking a silence of 30 years, former FBI official W. Mark Felt stepped forward as "Deep Throat," the secret Washington Post source during the Watergate scandal.

Ten years ago: President George W. Bush, under international pressure to take tough action against global warming, called for a world summit to set a long-term global strategy for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. In a breach of security, detailed plans for the new U.S. Embassy under construction in Baghdad appeared on the website of the architectural firm that was contracted to design the massive facility. Former Presidents Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton and George H.W. Bush attended the dedication of the Billy Graham Library in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Five years ago: Democrat John Edwards' campaign finance fraud case ended in a mistrial when jurors in Greensboro, North Carolina, acquitted him on one of six charges but were unable to decide whether he'd misused money from two wealthy donors to hide his pregnant mistress while he ran for president. (Prosecutors declined to retry Edwards on the five unresolved counts.) President Barack Obama welcomed his predecessor back to the White House for the unveiling of the official portraits of former President George W. Bush and former first lady Laura Bush. Fourteen-year-old Snigdha Nandipati (SNIHG'-nah nahn-dih-PAW'-tee) of San Diego won the 85th Scripps National Spelling Bee by correctly spelling "guetapens (GEHT'-uh-pawn)," a French-derived word meaning ambush, snare or trap.

One year ago: A jury found former suburban Chicago police officer Drew Peterson guilty of trying to hire someone to kill the prosecutor who helped to convict him in the killing of his third wife, Kathleen Savio. President Barack Obama personally congratulated the Villanova University men's basketball team for winning what he described as "maybe the best title game of all time" in the 2016 NCAA tournament.

Today's Birthdays: Actor-director Clint Eastwood is 87. Singer Peter Yarrow is 79. Former Humanitarian Terry Waite is 78. Singer-musician Augie Meyers is 77. Actress Sharon Gless is 74. Football Hall-of-Famer Joe Namath is 74. Broadcast journalist/commentator Bernard Goldberg is 72. Actor Tom Berenger is 67. Actor Gregory Harrison is 67. Actor Julio Oscar Mechoso is 62. Actor Kyle Secor is 60. Actress Roma Maffia (ma-FEE'-uh) is 59. Comedian Chris Elliott is 57. Actress Lea Thompson is 56. Singer Corey Hart is 55. Actor Hugh Dillon is 54. Rapper DMC is 53. Actress Brooke Shields is 52. Country musician Ed Adkins (The Derailers) is 50. TV host Phil Keoghan is 50. Jazz musician Christian McBride is 45. Actress Archie Panjabi is 45. Actor Colin Farrell is 41. Rock musician Scott Klopfenstein (Reel Big Fish) is 40. Actor Eric Christian Olsen is 40. Rock musician Andy Hurley (Fall Out Boy) is 37. Country singer Casey James (TV: "American Idol") is 35. Actor Jonathan Tucker is 35. Rapper Waka Flocka Flame is 31. Actor Curtis Williams Jr. is 30. Pop singer Normani Hamilton (Fifth Harmony) is 21.

Thought for Today: "A conference is a gathering of important people who singly can do nothing, but together can decide that nothing can be done." — Fred Allen, American comedian (born this date in 1894, died in 1956).

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
 


Update May 30, 2017

Theresa May, Jeremy Corbyn face tough questions on live TV

Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May, left is interviewed by broadcaster Jeremy Paxman. (Stefan Rousseau/ Pool Photo via AP)

Gregory Katz, Associated Press
LONDON (AP) — Prime Minister Theresa May and Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn faced tough questions and a skeptical audience in a live TV event Monday night ahead of next week's parliamentary elections.

It was not a debate, but did air policy and stylistic differences between the two foes. They did not appear together but were questioned separately by members of the audience and by aggressive interviewer Jeremy Paxman.

The June 8 election pits May, the Conservative Party leader who opposed Brexit before the referendum last June but now favors it, against Corbyn, who has alienated many longtime Labour supporters with his hard-left views.

The "Battle for Number 10" show broadcast on Sky News and Channel 4 brought the two prime contenders together in the same studio at the same time, but they did not appear together at any point. Voters are not likely to get a true debate before the vote.

Facing harsh questioning from Paxman, one of Britain's best known TV journalists, May defended her about-face on Brexit. She rebuffed his repeated attempts to get her to say whether she now thinks leaving the European Union is a good idea, saying only that the British voters have decided and that she is determined to get the best deal possible.

"We are doing the right thing in making a success of Brexit," she said, vowing to maintain her reputation as a "bloody difficult woman" during talks with European Union leaders if her party wins the election and keeps power.

But Paxman set the tone by saying that if he were an EU negotiator who had observed all her recent flip flops, he would think of her as a "blowhard who collapses at the first sound of gunfire."

May often found herself on the defensive as audience members grilled her on cuts to the police, National Health Service and education, and a so-called "dementia tax" that might make it harder for elderly Britons to pass on their property to their heirs.

At one point a heckler yelled, "You've clearly failed."

Corbyn did not enjoy smooth sailing either, with Paxman making numerous accusations and typically cutting Corbyn off before he could reply. Paxman challenged Corbyn's refusal to denounce the Irish Republican Army and his having met with Hamas officials and suggested the Labour leader would seek to abolish the monarchy if his party triumphed.

Corbyn said getting rid of Britain's constitutional monarchy is "certainly not on my agenda."

He said he was fighting the election for "social justice" and to reduce poverty, not to change the law regarding the monarch.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Thousands turn out to remember Kennedy on his 100th birthday

In this Nov. 22, 1963 file photo, President John F. Kennedy rides in a motorcade with his wife Jacqueline, right, Nellie Connally, left, and her husband, Gov. John Connally of Texas in Dallas, Texas., prior to President Kennedy's assassination.(AP Photo/File)

Crystal Hill, Associated Press

BOSTON (AP) — Americans turned out by the thousands Monday to celebrate the life and legacy of President John F. Kennedy on the day he would have turned 100.

The U.S. Postal Service commemorated Kennedy's centennial with a dedication of a JFK postage stamp in Brookline, a Boston suburb where he was born on May 29, 1917.

The image on the stamp is a 1960 photograph by Ted Spiegel of Kennedy when he was campaigning for president in Seattle. Boston Postmaster Nick Francescucci said the stamp was selected because of the way Kennedy was looking up.

"His eyes were high, they were looking to the sky (and) it looked like there was a big bright future ahead of us," Francescucci said.

Democratic U.S. Rep. Joe Kennedy III gave the keynote speech at the John Fitzgerald Kennedy National Historic Site — JFK's birthplace and childhood home. His great-uncle, he said, was a man who had honest and infectious pride. He not only implored a generation to serve, but he promised them a country worthy of their service, the congressman said.

A wreath-laying ceremony also was held to honor the 35th U.S. president at his gravesite at Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia. Kennedy served as president from January 1961 until he was assassinated Nov. 22, 1963. He was 46.

In Boston, the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum held a birthday celebration that included a cake made by the family of the baker who made the engagement cake for then-Sen. Kennedy and Jacqueline Bouvier, museum officials said. The celebration capped a long Memorial Day holiday weekend of events to honor Kennedy's legacy and drew thousands of visitors on his centennial celebration.

"There's no one issue or one event that we could do to highlight the different facets of (Kennedy),"said Steven Rothstein, the library foundation's executive director. "Many of his key ideas are timeless. We fundamentally believe that JFK is a visionary who never goes out of style."

The late president's commitment to service also was celebrated at a Saturday ceremony co-hosted by the National Peace Corps Association. Association president Glenn Blumhorst said those who have served in the Peace Corps see themselves as "the living legacy of JFK."

Kennedy issued an executive order establishing the Peace Corps in 1961.

"His call to service in asking what we can do for our country is the way that we responded," Blumhorst said. "We feel that that is one way of completing our national service."

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Tiger Woods blames medications for his arrest on DUI charge

In this Dec. 4, 2016, file photo, Tiger Woods reacts after a putt during the final round at the Hero World Challenge golf tournament, in Nassau, Bahamas. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky, File)

Doug Ferguson, AP Golf Writer

Tiger Woods attributed an "unexpected reaction" to prescription medicine for his arrest on a DUI charge that landed him in a Florida jail Monday for nearly four hours.

Woods, the 14-time major champion who had back surgery five weeks ago, was arrested on suspicion of DUI at about 3 a.m. Monday and taken to Palm Beach County jail. He was released on his own recognizance.

An arrest report might be available on Tuesday, Jupiter Police spokeswoman Kristin Rightler said.

"I understand the severity of what I did and I take full responsibility for my actions," Woods said in a statement Monday evening. "I want the public to know that alcohol was not involved. What happened was an unexpected reaction to prescribed medications. I didn't realize the mix of medications had affected me so strongly."

Woods apologized to his family, friends and fans and said, "I expect more from myself, too."

"I will do everything in my power to ensure this never happens again," he said.

Woods, whose 79 victories rank No. 2 on the PGA Tour's career list, has not competed for nearly four months. He is out for the rest of the season while he recovers from fusion surgery performed April 20 in Texas.

In an update posted Wednesday on his website, he said the surgery provided instant relief from pain and that he hasn't "felt this good in years."

Police said Woods was arrested on Military Trail, a six-lane road, south of Indian Creek Parkway. Woods did not say in his statement where he had been or what he was doing at that hour. Jail records show that the 41-year-old was booked into jail at 7:18 a.m. and released at 10:50 a.m. The jail released a booking photo of Woods in a white T-shirt.

Rightler, the police spokeswoman, said she did not have details about the circumstances leading to Woods' arrest, nor did she have any information about whether the arrest involved drugs or alcohol.

His agent at Excel Sports, Mark Steinberg, did not respond to a voicemail from The Associated Press seeking comment. PGA Tour spokesman Ty Votaw said the tour would have no comment.

Woods said in his statement that he fully cooperated with law enforcement and thanked Jupiter Police and the Palm Beach County Sheriff's Office for being professional.

Notah Begay, a roommate of Woods when they played at Stanford, was empathetic. Begay was arrested for aggravated drunken driving in 2000 when he ran into a car outside a bar in New Mexico. He was sentenced to 364 days in jail, with all but seven days suspended.

"It's embarrassing for Tiger, something that you can't go back and change," Begay said on Golf Channel from the NCAA men's golf championship in Sugar Grove, Illinois, where he was working for the network. "I've been there myself. ... But it was a turning point in my life. Hopefully, it's something he'll learn from, grow from, take responsibility for and use it to make some changes."

Woods has not been seen at a golf tournament since he opened with a 77 at the Omega Dubai Desert Classic in February, withdrawing the next day because of back spasms. He was in Los Angeles for the Genesis Open, run by his Tiger Woods Foundation, but he did not come to the course at Riviera because of his back.

He was at the Masters, but only to attend the dinner for past champions.

Woods, who had been No. 1 longer than any other golfer, has not been a factor since his last victory in August 2013 as he battled through back surgeries from a week before the 2014 Masters until his most recent fusion surgery on his lower back a month ago.

It was the first time Woods has run into trouble off the golf course since he plowed his SUV into a tree and a fire hydrant outside his Windermere, Florida, home in the early morning after Thanksgiving in 2009, which led to revelations that he had multiple extramarital affairs.

A police report then showed that a Florida trooper who suspected Woods was driving under the influence sought a subpoena for the golfer's blood test results from the hospital, but prosecutors rejected the petition for insufficient information.

A witness, who wasn't identified in the report, told the trooper he had been drinking alcohol earlier. The same witness also said Woods had been prescribed two drugs, the sleep aid Ambien and the painkiller Vicodin. The report did not say who the witness was but said it was the same person who pulled Woods from the vehicle after the accident. Woods' wife has told police that she used a golf club to smash the back windows of the Cadillac Escalade to help her husband out.

He eventually was cited for careless driving and fined $164.

Woods and wife Elin Nordegren divorced in 2010. He later had a relationship with Olympic ski champion Lindsey Vonn that lasted two years.

Associated Press writer Jennifer Kay in Miami Beach, Florida, contributed to this report.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Bomb kills 13, hurts 24 in Baghdad; IS claims responsibility

Murtada Faraj, Associated Press
BAGHDAD (AP) — A car bomb exploded outside a popular ice cream shop in central Baghdad just after midnight Tuesday, killing 13 people and wounding 24, hospital and police officials said.

The Islamic State militant group claimed responsibility for the attack, which Iraqi officials said involved apparently remotely detonated explosives inside a parked car. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity in line with regulations.

The attack came just days into the holy month of Ramadan when Muslims fast during daylight hours. After sundown, families break their fast and Baghdad's restaurants and cafes quickly fill up.

Videos posted to social media showed chaotic scenes on the streets surrounding the blast. A number of wounded lay on the ground, others propped themselves up on the colorful park benches outside the ice cream shop. One young girl, wearing a ribbon and bow in her hair, wandered the scene dazed.

Ramadan is often marked by an uptick in violence in Iraq.

Last year, Baghdad was rocked by a huge truck bomb attack that targeted a popular retail district in the city center where young people and families were shopping for new clothes ahead of the holiday that marks the end of Ramadan. The blast killed hundreds in the single deadliest event in Baghdad since Saddam Hussein was toppled in 2003. The IS group also claimed responsibility for that bombing, which ultimately led to the resignation of Iraq's interior minister.

Tuesday's attack comes as Iraqi troops are slowing pushing IS fighters out of their last strongholds in the northern city of Mosul. Iraqi commanders say the offensive, which recently entered its eight month, will mark the end of the IS caliphate in Iraq, but concede the group will likely increase insurgent attacks in the wake of military defeats.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Today in History - Tuesday, May 30, 2017

The Associated Press

Today is Tuesday, May 30, the 150th day of 2017. There are 215 days left in the year.

Today's Highlight in History:

On May 30, 1922, the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. was dedicated in a ceremony attended by President Warren G. Harding, Chief Justice William Howard Taft and Robert Todd Lincoln.

On this date:

In 1431, Joan of Arc, condemned as a heretic, was burned at the stake in Rouen, France.

In 1536, England's King Henry VIII married his third wife, Jane Seymour, 11 days after the king's second wife, Anne Boleyn, was beheaded for treason and adultery.

In 1883, 12 people were trampled to death in a stampede sparked by a rumor that the recently opened Brooklyn Bridge was in danger of collapsing.

In 1911, the first Indy 500 took place at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway; the winner was Ray Harroun, who drove a Marmon Wasp for more than 6 1/2 hours at an average speed of 74.6 mph and collected a prize of $10,000.

In 1937, ten people were killed when police fired on steelworkers demonstrating near the Republic Steel plant in South Chicago.

In 1943, during World War II, American troops secured the Aleutian island of Attu from Japanese forces.

In 1958, unidentified American service members killed in World War II and the Korean War were interred in the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery.

In 1966, NASA launched Surveyor 1, a probe that made a soft landing on the moon three days later. The Beatles single "Paperback Writer" was released in the United States by Capitol Records.

In 1971, the American space probe Mariner 9 blasted off from Cape Kennedy on a journey to Mars.

In 1982, Spain became NATO's 16th member.

In 1997, Jesse K. Timmendequas was convicted in Trenton, New Jersey, of raping and strangling a seven-year-old neighbor, Megan Kanka, whose 1994 murder inspired "Megan's Law," requiring that communities be notified when sex offenders move in. (Timmendequas received a sentence of death that was later commuted to life in prison after New Jersey abolished capital punishment.)

In 2002, a solemn, wordless ceremony marked the end of the agonizing cleanup at ground zero in New York, 8ฝ months after 9/11.

Ten years ago: The Taliban claimed responsibility for shooting down a Chinook helicopter over southern Afghanistan, killing five U.S. soldiers, a Canadian and a Briton. Abdul Rahman Maadha al-Amry, a Saudi being held at the Guantanamo Bay prison since 2002, was found dead, an apparent suicide.

Five years ago: A gunman in Seattle fatally shot four people inside a cafe and a fifth victim in a carjacking before killing himself. The National September 11 Memorial and Museum marked the 10th anniversary of the end of cleanup operations at the site with a tribute to recovery workers and first responders. Kicking off her first trip abroad in nearly a quarter-century, Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi (ahng sahn soo chee) offered encouragement to impoverished migrants in neighboring Thailand.

One year ago: President Barack Obama challenged Americans on Memorial Day to fill the silence from those who died serving their country with love and support for families of the fallen, "not just with words but with our actions."

Today's Birthdays: Actor Clint Walker is 90. Actress Ruta Lee is 82. Actor Keir Dullea is 81. Actor Michael J. Pollard is 78. Pro and College Football Hall of Famer Gale Sayers is 74. Rock musician Lenny Davidson (The Dave Clark Five) is 73. Actor Stephen Tobolowsky is 66. Actor Colm Meaney is 64. Actor Ted McGinley is 59. Actor Ralph Carter is 56. Actress Tonya Pinkins is 55. Country singer Wynonna Judd is 53. Rock musician Tom Morello (Audioslave; Rage Against The Machine) is 53. Actor Mark Sheppard is 53. Movie director Antoine Fuqua is 52. Actor John Ross Bowie is 46. Rock musician Patrick Dahlheimer (Live) is 46. Actress Idina Menzel is 46. Actor Trey Parker is 45. Rapper Cee Lo Green is 42. Rapper Remy Ma is 37. Actor Blake Bashoff is 36. Christian rock musician James Smith (Underoath) is 35. Actor Jake Short is 20. Actor Sean Giambrone is 18. Actor Jared Gilmore is 17.

Thought for Today: "There is no fun in doing nothing when you have nothing to do." — Jerome K. Jerome, English author and humorist (1859-1927).

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Update May 29, 2017

Cannes Palme d'Or goes to Ruben Ostlund's "The Square"

Director Ruben Ostlund reacts to winning the Palme d'Or award. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)

CANNES, France (AP) — The Cannes Film Festival awarded its coveted Palme d'Or award to Ruben Ostlund's Swedish comedy "The Square" on Sunday, while Sofia Coppola became only the second woman to win the best director award.

"Oh my god! OK," the Swedish filmmaker exclaimed after he bounded onto the stage to collect the prestigious Palme, in a rare and somewhat surprising win for a comedy.

In "The Square," Claes Bang plays a museum director whose manicured life begins to unravel after a series of events that upset his, and the museum's, calm equilibrium. The movie's title comes from an art installation that Bang's character is prepping, which invites anyone who enters a small square to be kind and generous.

The film's satire and exploration of moral dilemmas culminated in one of the festival's most eye-catching scenes. A muscled, grunting man pretending to be a gorilla upsets a black-tie dinner for the museum, sniffing attendees and dragging a woman by the hair.

The president of the Cannes jury, Spanish filmmaker Pedro Almodovar, praised the film for exploring the "dictatorship" of political correctness and those trapped by it.

"They live in a kind of hell because of that," Almodovar said.

"It's clever. It's witty. It's funny. It deals with questions so important," said French actress and filmmaker Agnes Jaoui, a member of the jury that also included Americans Will Smith and Jessica Chastain.

Most odds makers didn't have "The Square" as a favorite to win the prestigious Palme d'Or, the top prize awarded at Cannes.

Coppola won best director for "The Beguiled," her remake of Don Siegel's 1971 Civil War drama about a Union soldier hiding out in a Southern girls' school. Hailed as Coppola's most feminist work yet, the remade thriller told from a more female point of view stars Nicole Kidman and Kirsten Dunst, with Colin Farrell playing the wounded soldier.

Coppola was one of three female filmmakers out of 19 in competition for the Palme this year. The first — and until now, only — female winner of the best director prize was Soviet director Yuliya Ippolitovna Solntseva in 1961.

Diane Kruger was named best actress and Joaquin Phoenix best actor as the festival celebrated its 70th anniversary.

Kruger was honored for her performance in Fatih Akin's "In the Fade." She played a German woman whose son and Turkish husband are killed in a bomb attack. The film alludes to a series of actual killings that shook Germany six years ago, when it came to light that police had spent more time investigating the possible mob connections of migrant victims than the tell-tale signs of the far-right plot eventually uncovered.

Actress Diane Kruger with her Best Actress award.(AP Photo/Alastair Grant)

"I cannot accept this award without thinking about anyone who has ever been affected by an act of terrorism and who is trying to pick up the pieces and go on living after having lost everything," the actress said. "Please know that you are not forgotten."

Phoenix was recognized for his role in Lynne Ramsay's thriller "You Were Never Really Here," in which he played a tormented war veteran trying to save a teenage girl from a sex trafficking ring.

Actor Joaquin Phoenix with his Best Actor award.(AP Photo/Thibault Camus)

The actor wore sneakers on stage as he collected the prize. He said his leather shoes had been flown ahead of him. He apologized for his appearance, saying the prize was "totally unexpected."

The French AIDS drama "120 Beats Per Minute" won the Grand Prize from the jury. The award recognizes a strong film that missed out on the Palme d'Or.

Directed by Robin Campillo, the co-screenwriter of the Palme d'Or-winning film "The Class," the movie centers on the activist group ACT UP in Paris in the 1990s during the AIDS crisis.

The film's docu-drama retelling of that painful period, combined with a burgeoning spirit of unity for the gay community, earned it some of the best reviews of the festival.

Vanity Fair called the film "a vital new gay classic."

Almodovar said: "I loved the movie."

The jury also presented a special prize to Nicole Kidman to celebrate the festival's 70th anniversary.

Kidman wasn't at the French Rivera ceremony, but sent a video message from Nashville, saying she was "absolutely devastated" to miss the show.

Jury member Smith made the best of the situation, pretending to be Kidman.

He fake-cried and said in halting French, "merci beaucoup madames et monsieurs."

There were no prizes for the first Netflix releases selected to be in competition for the Palme d'Or: Bong Joon-ho's "Okja" and Noah Baumbach's "The Meyerowitz Stories."

Almodovar had made clear beforehand that he didn't want the Palme to go to a movie that isn't shown on big screens. The Netflix selections prompted protests from French movie distributors and led Cannes to rule out, beginning next year, streaming-only films.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
 


More arrests in Manchester attack; UK remains on high alert

This is a handout photo taken from CCTV and issued on Saturday, May 27, 2017 by Greater Manchester Police who have altered the surrounding area of Salman Abedi, in an unknown location on the night of the attack on Manchester Arena. The police released surveillance-camera images of the bomber on the night of the May attack as they appealed for information about his final days. (Greater Manchester Police via AP)

Jill Lawless, Associated Press

LONDON (AP) — British police made two more arrests and stormed three more locations Sunday as they hunted for suspects in the Manchester bombing, while a government minister said members of attacker Salman Abedi's network may still be at large.

Greater Manchester Police said two men — one 25 years old and the other 19 — were arrested in the city on suspicion of terrorist offenses. Eleven other men between the ages of 18 and 44 also were in custody.

Most of the searches and arrests since Monday night's bombing have been in multi-ethnic south Manchester, where Abedi — the son of Libyan parents — was born and raised.

Police say that 1,000 people are working on the investigation, trying to track down Abedi's accomplices and piece together his movements in the days before he detonated a bomb at an Ariana Grande concert. The explosion killed 22 people — including seven children under 18 — and injured more than 100.

Abedi died in the blast. Investigators say they have dismantled a large part of his network, but expect to make more arrests.

"The operation is still at full tilt," Home Secretary Amber Rudd said, adding that some suspects could remain at large.

"Until the operation is complete, we can't be entirely sure that it is closed," she said.

British police now have 13 suspects in custody — including Abedi's elder brother Ismail — and have searched properties across Manchester, a city in northwest England. Another brother and Abedi's father have been detained in Libya.

Police have released surveillance-camera images of Abedi on the night of the attack that show him dressed in sneakers, jeans, a dark jacket and a baseball cap. The straps of a backpack are visible on his shoulders.

Authorities are appealing for more information about his final days. They say he returned to Britain from Libya on May 18, and likely completed assembling his bomb at a rented apartment in central Manchester.

There were prayers for the victims at church services across Manchester on Sunday. In Rome, Pope Francis led thousands of people in St. Peter's Square in prayer, saying he was "close to the relatives and all those who are weeping for the dead."

On Saturday, Britain lowered its official terrorism threat level from "critical" to "severe" after police said they had dismantled a large part of Abedi's network.

But security remained high at major events across Britain on Sunday, including the Great Manchester Run road race, where police armed with submachine guns protected thousands of participants and spectators.

Peter Hook, a member of seminal Manchester band New Order, was among the runners and said the tragedy had brought people together.

"I've always had a pride in this city, ever since I was born," he said. "They picked the wrong people to mess with this time."

The government is facing criticism after acknowledging that Abedi was on security services' radar, but wasn't a major focus of scrutiny.

Rudd said Sunday that intelligence agencies were monitoring 3,000 suspected extremists and had a wider pool of 20,000 people of interest.

"I would not rush to conclusions ... that they have somehow missed something," Rudd said.

The family of one victim, 18-year-old Georgina Callander, said her life had been cut short by "evil, evil men prepared to ruin lives and destroy families."

"I wish I could say that Georgina is one of the last to die in this way, but unless our government opens its eyes we know we are only another in a long line of parents on a list that continues to grow," the family said in a statement released through Greater Manchester Police.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


BA says most flights running; angry passengers face delays

 

In this image taken from the twitter feed of Emily Puddifer, a view of Terminal 5 departure lounge, at London's Heathrow airport after flights were canceled due to the airport suffering an IT systems failure, Saturday, May 27, 2017. (Emily Puddifer via AP)

Jill Lawless, Associated Press

LONDON (AP) — British Airways said many of its IT systems were back up and running Sunday, but some travelers will likely face cancellations and delays for a third straight day after a global computer failure grounded hundreds of flights.

BA chief executive Alex Cruz said Sunday the airline was running a "near-full operation" at London's Gatwick Airport and planned to operate all scheduled long-haul services from Heathrow. But he said there would still be delays, as well as some canceled short-haul flights.

The airline said it will run a full schedule at Gatwick on Monday and intends to run its full long-haul flight schedule and a "high proportion" of its shorter flights at Heathrow.

BA canceled all flights from Heathrow and Gatwick Saturday after the IT outage, which it blamed on a power-supply problem. The glitch threw the plans of thousands of travelers into disarray, on what is a holiday weekend in Britain.

BA operates hundreds of flights from Heathrow and Gatwick on a typical day — and both are major hubs for worldwide travel.

Cruz apologized in a video statement, saying: "I know this has been a horrible time for customers."

Passengers faced hours-long lines to check in, reclaim lost luggage or rebook flights at Terminal 5, BA's hub at Heathrow. Cruz said that to reduce overcrowding travelers will only be let into the terminal 90 minutes before their flights.

Passengers — some of whom had spent the night at the airport — faced frustrating waits to learn if and when they could fly out.

"Everyone is upset. There's people in tears," said Melanie Ware, who flew in from Los Angeles and was trying to get to Venice on her honeymoon.

"We rebooked for Venice for tonight, which they also have canceled now," she told Sky News. "So we have no way of getting out of Heathrow and they haven't compensated us for anything, and we're stuck and this is the worst honeymoon ever.

"British Airways has ruined our honeymoon."

Tonda Sallee, who was trying to fly to Frankfurt, said she has been in line for five hours, "and we have no idea how long we'll be in line. The rest of the day I'm sure, and we probably won't fly out today either."

Many passengers complained about a lack of information from the airline.

"Some 80-year-old lady was standing around waiting for announcements, et cetera, and she fell over," said Londoner Terry Page, who managed to get on one of the last flights from Heathrow to Dallas-Fort Worth on Saturday. He and other passengers arrived, but their luggage did not.

"We helped her up and she said 'I'm just so tired,' " Page said. "It's been a terrible, terrible day."

While not that frequent, when airline outages do happen, the effects are widespread, high-profile and can hit travelers across the globe.

BA passengers were hit with severe delays in July and September 2016 because of problems with the airline's online check-in systems.

In August 2016, Delta planes around the world were grounded when an electrical component failed and led to a shutdown of the transformer that provides power to the airline's data center. Delta said it lost $100 million in revenue as a result of the outage.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Alaska volcano erupts again; aviation alert raised to red

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — An Alaska volcano that has been active for nearly six months has erupted again.

The Alaska Volcano Observatory says Bogoslof Volcano in the Aleutian Islands erupted at 2:16 p.m. Sunday and sent a cloud of ash at least 35,000 feet (10,668 meters) high. The eruption lasted 55 minutes.

Ash can harm and stop jet engines. Ash from southwest Alaska volcanos is a threat airliners operating between North America and Asia when a cloud rises above 20,000 feet (6,096 meters).

After the eruption, the Aviation Color Code was raised to red, the highest level.

The agency says a person on nearby Unalaska Island reports seeing a large white-gray mushroom cloud form over Bogoslof, with ash falling out to the west.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Today in History - Monday, May 29, 2017

The Associated Press

Today is Monday, May 29, the 149th day of 2017. There are 216 days left in the year. This is the Memorial Day observance.

Today's Highlight in History:

On May 29, 1917, the 35th president of the United States, John Fitzgerald Kennedy, was born in Brookline, Massachusetts.

On this date:

In 1453, Constantinople fell to the Ottoman Turks, marking the end of the Byzantine Empire.

In 1660, Britain's King Charles II was restored to the throne on his 30th birthday after nine years in exile.

In 1765, Patrick Henry denounced the Stamp Act before Virginia's House of Burgesses.

In 1790, Rhode Island became the 13th original colony to ratify the United States Constitution.

In 1848, Wisconsin became the 30th state of the union.

In 1932, World War I veterans began arriving in Washington to demand cash bonuses they weren't scheduled to receive until 1945.

In 1942, the movie "Yankee Doodle Dandy," starring James Cagney as George M. Cohan, premiered at a war-bonds benefit in New York. Bing Crosby, the Ken Darby Singers and the John Scott Trotter Orchestra recorded Irving Berlin's "White Christmas" in Los Angeles for Decca Records. Actor John Barrymore died in Hollywood at age 60.

In 1953, Mount Everest was conquered as Edmund Hillary of New Zealand and Tensing Norgay of Nepal became the first climbers to reach the summit.

In 1961, a couple in Paynesville, West Virginia, became the first recipients of food stamps under a pilot program created by President John F. Kennedy.

In 1977, Janet Guthrie became the first woman to race in the Indianapolis 500, finishing in 29th place (the winner was A.J. Foyt).

In 1987, a jury in Los Angeles acquitted "Twilight Zone" movie director John Landis and four associates of involuntary manslaughter in the movie-set deaths of actor Vic Morrow and two child actors, 7-year-old Myca Dinh Le and 6-year-old Renee Shin-Yi Chen, who were killed by a falling helicopter.

In 1999, Discovery became the first space shuttle to dock with the International Space Station. Olusegun Obasanjo (ah-LOO'-see-guhn oh-BAH'-suhn-joh) became Nigeria's first civilian president in 15 years, ending a string of military regimes.

Ten years ago: President George W. Bush ordered new U.S. economic sanctions to pressure Sudan's government to halt bloodshed in Darfur. Cindy Sheehan, the soldier's mother who galvanized an anti-war movement with her month-long protest outside President Bush's ranch, announced her "resignation" as the public face of the movement. In Hudson Oaks, Texas, Gilberta Estrada, 25, and her four daughters were discovered hanging in a closet in their home in an apparent murder-suicide; Estrada's 8-month-old baby survived.

Five years ago: Mitt Romney clinched the Republican presidential nomination with a win in the Texas primary. Serena Williams lost in the first round of a major tournament for the first time, falling to Virginie Razzano of France 4-6, 7-6 (5), 6-3 at the French Open. Doc Watson, the Grammy-award winning folk musician whose lightning-fast style of flatpicking influenced guitarists around the world for more than a half-century, died in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, at age 89.

One year ago: An Army veteran of two Afghanistan tours killed one person and wounded several others during a shooting rampage in west Houston before being gunned down by a SWAT officer. French President Francois Hollande (frahn-SWAH' oh-LAWND') and German Chancellor Angela Merkel (AHN'-geh-lah MEHR'-kuhl) solemnly marked 100 years since the World War I Battle of Verdun. Alexander Rossi won the 100th running of the Indianapolis 500.

Today's Birthdays: Former Baseball Commissioner Fay Vincent is 79. Motorsports Hall of Famer Al Unser is 78. Actor Kevin Conway is 75. Actor Helmut Berger is 73. Rock singer Gary Brooker (Procol Harum) is 72. Actor Anthony Geary is 70. Actor Cotter Smith is 68. Singer Rebbie (ree-bee) Jackson is 67. Movie composer Danny Elfman is 64. Singer LaToya Jackson is 61. Actor Ted Levine is 60. Actress Annette Bening is 59. Actor Rupert Everett is 58. Actor Adrian Paul is 58. Singer Melissa Etheridge is 56. Actress Lisa Whelchel is 54. Actress Tracey Bregman is 54. Rock musician Noel Gallagher is 50. Singer Jayski McGowan (Quad City DJ's) is 50. Actor Anthony Azizi is 48. Rock musician Chan Kinchla (Blues Traveler) is 48. Rock musician Mark Lee (Third Day) is 44. Cartoonist Aaron McGruder ("The Boondocks") is 43. Singer Melanie Brown (Spice Girls) is 42. Rapper Playa Poncho is 42. Latin singer Fonseca is 38. NBA player Carmelo Anthony is 33. Actor Billy Flynn (TV: "Days of Our Lives") is 32. Actor Blake Foster is 32. Actress Riley Keough is 28. Actor Brandon Mychal Smith is 28. Actress Kristen Alderson is 26. Actress Lorelei Linklater is 24.

Thought for Today: "We are not afraid to entrust the American people with unpleasant facts, foreign ideas, alien philosophies, and competitive values. For a nation that is afraid to let its people judge the truth and falsehood in an open market is a nation that is afraid of its people." — President John F. Kennedy (1917-1963).

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Update May 27 - 28, 2017

Today in History - Sunday, May 28, 2017

The Associated Press

Today is Sunday, May 28, the 148th day of 2017. There are 217 days left in the year.

Today's Highlight in History:

On May 28, 1977, 165 people were killed when fire raced through the Beverly Hills Supper Club in Southgate, Kentucky. (Investigators cited faulty electrical wiring, fire safety code violations and overcrowding as reasons for the disaster.)

On this date:

In 1533, the Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Cranmer, declared the marriage of England's King Henry VIII to Anne Boleyn valid.

In 1892, the Sierra Club was organized in San Francisco.

In 1912, the Senate Commerce Committee issued its report on the Titanic disaster that cited a "state of absolute unpreparedness," improperly tested safety equipment and an "indifference to danger" as some of the causes of an "unnecessary tragedy."

In 1929, the first all-color talking picture, "On with the Show!" produced by Warner Bros., opened in New York.

In 1934, the Dionne quintuplets — Annette, Cecile, Emilie, Marie and Yvonne — were born to Elzire Dionne at the family farm in Ontario, Canada.

In 1937, President Franklin D. Roosevelt pushed a button in Washington signaling that vehicular traffic could begin crossing the just-opened Golden Gate Bridge in California. Neville Chamberlain became prime minister of Britain. In Nazi Germany, Volkswagen was founded by the German Labour Front for the purpose of creating a "people's car."

In 1940, during World War II, the Belgian army surrendered to invading German forces.

In 1945, the novel "Brideshead Revisited" by Evelyn Waugh was published in London by Chapman & Hall.

In 1957, National League owners gave permission for the Brooklyn Dodgers and New York Giants baseball teams to move to Los Angeles and San Francisco.

In 1961, Amnesty International had its beginnings with the publication of an article in the British newspaper The Observer, "The Forgotten Prisoners."

In 1987, to the embarrassment of Soviet officials, Mathias Rust (mah-TEE'-uhs rust), a young West German pilot, landed a private plane in Moscow's Red Square without authorization. (Rust was freed by the Soviets the following year.)

In 1998, comic actor Phil Hartman of "Saturday Night Live" and "NewsRadio" fame was shot to death at his home in Encino, California, by his wife, Brynn, who then killed herself.

Ten years ago: The United States and Iran broke a 27-year diplomatic freeze with a four-hour meeting in Baghdad about Iraqi security. President George W. Bush, during a Memorial Day visit to Arlington National Cemetery, honored U.S. troops who had fought and died for freedom and expressed his steely resolve to succeed in the war in Iraq. Miss Japan Rita Mori was crowned Miss Universe 2007 at the pageant in Mexico City.

Five years ago: President Barack Obama paid tribute on Memorial Day to the men and women who died defending America; speaking at the Vietnam War Memorial in Washington, Obama pointed to Vietnam veterans as an under-appreciated and sometimes maligned group of war heroes. Nineteen people, including 13 children, were killed in a mall fire in Doha, Qatar.

One year ago: A 3-year-old boy fell into a gorilla enclosure at the Cincinnati Zoo; he was rescued by a team that shot to death a 400-pound gorilla named Harambe after the rescuers concluded that the boy's life was at stake, a decision which led to mourning and criticism around the globe. New Orleans Pelicans guard Bryce Dejean-Jones was shot to death by an apartment resident after kicking down the door of what he mistakenly thought was his girlfriend's flat in Dallas. Mexican soccer star Alan Pulido was abducted by armed men after leaving a party near Ciudad Victoria; he managed to escape his kidnappers a day later.

Today's Birthdays: Rockabilly singer-musician Sonny Burgess is 88. Actress Carroll Baker is 86. Producer-director Irwin Winkler is 86. Actor John Karlen is 84. Basketball Hall-of-Famer Jerry West is 79. Former New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani is 73. Singer Gladys Knight is 73. Actress-director Sondra Locke is 73. Singer Billy Vera is 73. Actor Jean-Pierre Leaud is 73. Singer John Fogerty is 72. Country musician Jerry Douglas (Alison Krauss and Union Station) is 61. Actor Louis Mustillo is 59. U.S. Rep. Mark Sanford, R-S.C.., is 57. Actor Brandon Cruz (TV: "The Courtship of Eddie's Father") is 55. Country singer Phil Vassar is 53. Actress Christa Miller is 53. Singer-musician Chris Ballew (Presidents of the USA) is 52. Rapper Chubb Rock is 49. Singer Kylie Minogue (KY'-lee mihn-OHG') is 49. Actor Justin Kirk is 48. Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., is 46. Olympic gold medal figure skater Ekaterina Gordeeva is 46. Television personality Elisabeth Hasselbeck is 40. Actor Jake Johnson is 39. Actor Jesse Bradford is 38. Actress Monica Keena is 38. Actress Alexa Davalos is 35. Actress Megalyn Echikunwoke (eh-cheek-uh-WALK'-ay) is 35. Pop singer Colbie Caillat (kal-LAY') is 32. Actress Carey Mulligan is 32. Actor Joseph Cross is 31.

Thought for Today: "Intelligence rules the world, ignorance carries the burden." — Marcus Garvey, Jamaican black nationalist (1887-1940).

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
 


Rocker Chris Cornell remembered as 'voice of our generation'

Flowers adorn the grave marker for musician Chris Cornell at the Hollywood Forever Cemetery.(AP Photo/Sandy Cohen)

Sandy Cohen, AP Entertainment Writer

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Music's elite and Hollywood stars remembered Chris Cornell at a somber memorial service Friday that focused on the Soundgarden frontman's love of family and friends as much as it did on his musical achievements as one of rock's leading voices.

"Chris was as melodic as The Beatles, as heavy as Sabbath and as haunting as Edgar Allan Poe," Tom Morello, Cornell's Audioslave bandmate, said during his eulogy. "The demons he wrestled with were real, but he harnessed those demons and rode them like a mother-flipping chariot of lightning strapped with Marshall stacks to make some of the greatest rock 'n' roll of all time."

Linkin Park singer Chester Bennington and guitarist Brad Delson performed Leonard Cohen's "Hallelujah" for the crowd of mourners, including Brad Pitt, Pharrell Williams, James Franco, Christian Bale and numerous members of rock royalty, many of whom were moved to tears.

Four large portraits of Cornell were on display on a dais where Morello, actor Josh Brolin, Pearl Jam bassist Jeff Ament, film producer Eric Esrailian and Cornell's Soundgarden bandmates Kim Thayil and Matt Cameron delivered eulogies under overcast skies at Hollywood Forever Cemetery.

They all spoke of the rocker's compassion and his delight in his three children. Cameron said he and Cornell had "so many normal dad conversations" about the Cornell kids: Christopher, Toni and Lily.

"Losing my brother and artistic soulmate will always pale in comparison with you three kids losing your dad," Cameron said. "Let it be known that I am here for you and will forever be in your lives."

Linda Ramone opened the service with word that Cornell was buried next to her late husband, punk rocker Johnny Ramone, whose headstone features a statue of him playing guitar.

Cornell's grave marker, decorated with bouquets of flowers and several red roses, reads, "Voice of our generation and an artist for all time."

Cornell's music played before the hourlong service, and afterward as guests visited his grave site in the cemetery's Garden of Legends section.

Among those paying respects were Dave Grohl of Foo Fighters; Krist Novoselic from Nirvana; Lars Ulrich and James Hetfield of Metallica; Dave Navarro and Perry Farrell of Jane's Addiction; singer-songwriter Joe Walsh; guitarist Nile Rodgers; rocker Courtney Love and Bush's Gavin Rossdale.

Scores of fans gathered outside the cemetery during the service awaiting a public viewing of Cornell's grave site later Friday afternoon.

"We had to be here. He was part of our generation," said 49-year-old Marcus Dubray, breaking into tears. He and his wife were visiting Los Angeles from Sacramento for her birthday when they heard about Cornell's service.

"I was ready to go to Seattle" for the funeral, said fellow fan Alfredo Perez, 47.

Melody Andrade brought her 4-year-old son Jude to memorialize the Seattle rocker. The pair wore matching T-shirts that read, "Say Hello 2 Heaven," the title of a Temple of the Dog song Cornell wrote.

"I feel like this is just as big as the death of Elvis or John Lennon. That's why I had to bring my son," Andrade said. "There will never be another. He's a modern day Freddie Mercury. I needed some closure on this."

Fans brought flowers and notes and sang Cornell's songs together. Some listened to his music aloud on their phones. One fan brought a guitar and strummed Soundgarden songs. Many left heartfelt notes, guitar picks and one woman left roses wrapped in a flannel shirt, an emblem of the grunge era.

Hollywood Forever Cemetery is the final resting place for numerous stars, including Jayne Mansfield, Douglas Fairbanks, Rudolph Valentino and Cecil B. DeMille.

Cornell, 52, was pronounced dead May 18 after he was found unresponsive in a Detroit hotel room hours after performing a concert with Soundgarden. Coroner's officials said preliminary autopsy results show the singer hanged himself, but full toxicology results remain pending. The singer's family has disputed the findings and claim Cornell may have taken more of an anti-anxiety drug than he was prescribed.

Cornell was a leading voice of the grunge movement in the 1990s. Besides Soundgarden, he scored hits as a solo artist and with bands Temple of the Dog and Audioslave.

He is survived by his wife and three children.

AP Entertainment Writer Nicole Evatt contributed to this report.

Follow Entertainment Writer Sandy Cohen at www.twitter.com/APSandy

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Sounds of silence? Trump's body language speaks volumes

In this May 25, 2017 file image taken from NATO TV, Montenegro Prime Minister Dusko Markovic, second right, appears to be pushed by President Donald Trump as they were given a tour of NATO's new headquarters.(NATO TV via AP, File)

Nancy Benac,Jonathon Lemire, Associated Press

TAORMINA, Italy (AP) — The alpha-male handshake. The deadpan reaction from NATO leaders. The presidential push to the front of the pack.

Even if Donald Trump hasn't done a lot of public speaking during his big trip abroad, the body language of the president and those around him has spoken volumes.

Day after day, with no presidential press conferences on the schedule, Trump watchers have instead parsed the president's movements, and taken away messages that are at times painfully obvious, at times puzzling.

Put it all together, though, and the sense emerges of a president aggressively, if somewhat awkwardly, trying to assert himself on the world stage — with mixed success depending on his audience.

"Throughout the trip he looked uncomfortable and isolated, others looked surprised or distant," presidential historian Julian Zelizer of Princeton wrote in an email. "The looks capture how much of the international community is dealing with the unorthodox president who has done little to show he cares about the role of the U.S. overseas."

There was certainly any number of routine and friendly interactions between Trump and world leaders.

But there was no mistaking the cool reception of NATO leaders who stood by with stone faces on Thursday as Trump lectured U.S. allies about the need to spend more on defense. No, heads were not bobbing as Trump intoned that he had been "very, very direct" with members of the NATO alliance in saying at they "must finally contribute their fair share."

That came on the heels of a straight-faced greeting from the pontiff. In a photo that quickly went viral, Pope Francis posed next to the president with a dour look while Trump grinned. Adding to the dissonant image, Trump's wife, Melania, and daughter, Ivanka, stood next to the president, silently staring off into the distance, their somber expressions heightened by their all black outfits.

Back in Brussels, after the outdoor NATO ceremony ended, as the leaders headed to their next event, most chatted and mingled, but Trump walked alone. It was a stark contrast to the way world leaders once maneuvered to get in the camera angle with Barack Obama when he was the new president on the block.

The scene repeated itself in Italy at the G-7 summit on Friday. After the "family photo" group shot, the other leaders convivially walked down the narrow Sicilian streets to their luncheon. Trump hung back and, minutes later, opted instead to ride in a golf cart. Later, a number of the leaders surrounded Trump, some laughing as they listened.

At the NATO group shot on Thursday Trump's move to get to the front of the pack again caused double-takes.

The president pushed himself past Montenegro's prime minister, Dusko Markovic, to get to the front of the group as the NATO leaders walked inside the alliance's new headquarters building.

Markovic gave a tense smile, and later called it a "harmless situation."

But plenty of people in the Balkans were not amused.

"It seems Donald Trump did not want that anyone overshadows his presence at the summit," said the Montenegro newspaper Vijesti.

Asked about the incident, White House press secretary Sean Spicer said he hadn't seen the encounter but noted that places were assigned for the group photo.

Earlier, Trump and new French President Emmanuel Macron had engaged in a power hand shake that came across as a meeting of alpha males when they met for the first time over lunch at the U.S. ambassador's residence in Brussels.

After some friendly chatter, the two gripped each other's hands so tightly before the cameras that their jaws seemed to clench. It looked like Trump was ready to pull away first but Macron wasn't quite ready to disengage.

"They're presenting themselves as equals," said body language expert Lillian Glass. "They're both alphas."

A different kind of hand-clasping — or lack thereof — also sparked chatter during the trip.

Two days in a row, the president and first lady Melania Trump failed to connect when Trump reached out to grab his wife's hand — interactions that were replayed in slow-motion and endlessly dissected online.

At a red-carpet welcome in Israel, Trump reached out to grab his wife's hand but she appeared to slap his hand away. A day later, in Rome, Trump seemed to reach for the first lady's hand just as she reached up to brush her hair aside. On Thursday, the two did hold hands as they made their way down the stairs of Air Force One on another stop in their itinerary.

Glass said the interactions left people wondering: "What is that going on in that relationship?"

There was no questioning Trump's friendly mojo with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu — the two embraced repeatedly while Trump was in Israel, in a telling contrast to the strained relationship the Israeli leader had with Obama.

Netanyahu even tried to intervene when a politician in his Likud party with a reputation for inappropriate antics tried to take a selfie of the unamused-looking president by attempting to swat away Oren Hazan's arm.

For diplomats, body language can be especially important.

Trump's ambassador to Israel, Ron Dermer, is probably wishing he'd had a better poker face during the president's Jerusalem stop.

When Trump told an Israeli delegation that he had just gotten back from the Middle East — which Jerusalem is clearly part of — Dermer instinctively reacted to the flub by putting his palm to his forehead.

Benac reported from Washington.

Follow Nancy Benac on Twitter at http://twitter.com/nbenac and Jonathan Lemire at https://twitter.com/JonLemire

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Melania Trump wears $51K Dolce & Gabbana jacket in Sicily

US First Lady Melania Trump. (AP Photo/Domenico Stinellis)

Colleen Barry, Associated Press

TAORMINA, Italy (AP) — Melania Trump's first outing in the Sicilian sunshine was in a colorful floral applique jacket by Dolce & Gabbana that sells for $51,000, or several thousand dollars below the median U.S. income in 2015.

She also carried a matching clutch to lunch with spouses of the G-7 leaders, held at the historic Elephants Palace and hosted by Catania's mayor.

The burst of color in the U.S. first lady's wardrobe came after a steady dose of mostly black during President Donald Trump's inaugural overseas tour, including a prim black lace dress with a matching mantilla headcover that she wore to meet Pope Francis, and a dark jacket with golden detailing on the cuff and collar that she wore for her arrival in Italy. Both outfits were also by Milan designers Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana.

Gabbana has celebrated each appearance with Instagram posts. He shared three photos of the floral jacket, worn over a simple white shift dress, with Mrs. Trump looking model-perfect as she stepped out of an SUV. Gabbana tagged the photo with hearts and a "Thank You" to @flotus #melaniatrump.

Dolce & Gabbana have made Sicily their fashion muse, so it made sense that Trump's wife would wear their designs in Sicily, the final stop on Trump's trip.

The White House did not respond to requests for comment on how much Mrs. Trump, a former model and the wife of an independently wealthy president, paid for the jacket. The U.S. government does not provide first ladies with a wardrobe allowance.

Several fashion designers have said publicly that they will not dress the first lady because they oppose her husband's policies.

The retail price for the Dolce & Gabbana jacket comes in at about $5,500 below the median U.S. household income of $56,516 in 2015, the most recent year for which figures are available from the U.S. Census Bureau.

As the Trumps traveled through Saudia Arabia, Israel, Italy, Brussels and then back to Italy, the president left it to top aides in Washington to explain the details of his federal budget proposal for 2018. Trump has proposed a $4.1 trillion spending plan that slashes safety net programs for the poor, including food stamps and Medicaid, while spending billions more on the military and protecting retirement programs for the elderly.

The fashion choices of America's first ladies are a longstanding source of public fascination, and Mrs. Trump is getting a taste of that on the trip, her first extended period in the public eye since her husband took office in January. She lives mostly at their penthouse at Trump Tower in New York with their 11-year-old son. The president has said they will move to the White House after the school year ends.

First ladies are almost always criticized or praised for whatever they wear.

Michelle Obama, for example, received rave reviews for most of the gowns she wore to White House state dinners that she and her husband hosted. But she was also mocked for some fashion choices, including wearing shorts on Air Force One and sporting designer sneakers that cost more than $500 to a food bank.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Alaska Natives honored for protecting territory during WWII

Gov. Bill Walker speaks at the Alaska Native Heritage Center.(AP Photo/Rachel D'Oro)

Rachael D'Oro, Associated Press

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Officials on Friday posthumously honored more than a dozen members of a largely Alaska Native citizen militia who protected the U.S. territory from the threat of Japanese invasion during World War II, bringing closure to their families for a service that went unrecognized for decades.

Gov. Bill Walker and state veterans affairs officials presented Army discharge papers to the relatives of 16 deceased members of the Alaska Territorial Guard during a ceremony ahead of Memorial Day weekend.

The event was an emotional time for Rebecca Czyz, the niece of militia member and Inupiat Eskimo sharpshooter Laura Beltz Wright, who was among just 23 women in the 6,400-member unit.

Czyz grew up with her aunt, who died in 1996. She said Wright was an adventurous woman who could outshoot most. She once ran mail by dog sled between villages and later owned a parka shop in Anchorage. She once told her niece that she would be fine with just a tent and a frying pan.

Czyz knew her aunt had served in the Territorial Guard but never paid much attention to that part of her life. She became more interested as she got older, and seeing the discharge papers gave her closure, Czyz said.

"I just felt very proud," she said. "It would have been an honor for her to be here, but at least her family can accept this award for her."

Also recognized was Jay B. Mallott, father of Lt. Gov. Byron Mallott, who could not make the event after his flight was canceled. The lieutenant governor's son, Ben Mallott, received his grandfather's papers.

"It feels pretty good to have his service honored and recognized," he said.

Alaska was still 17 years away from statehood when the militia formed in 1942 after Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor and points along Alaska's Aleutian Islands.

Nicknamed Uncle Sam's Men and Eskimo Scouts, the volunteer members stepped in to watch over the 586,000-square-mile territory, which was vulnerable to further attack with the National Guard pressed into federal service. And they did it without pay.

The militia disbanded with little fanfare in 1947, almost two years after the war ended. But members were not formally recognized by the Army as military veterans until 2004.

Nearly 2,600 discharge papers have been issued since then by the Army, which has worked with the state Department of Veterans and Military Affairs to obtain the documents. Officials at Alaska Native Heritage Center in Anchorage plan to make the ceremony a yearly event as more papers are issued.

Mercedes Angerman, deputy director of the state military agency, said obtaining the discharge papers is a lengthy and sometimes challenging process.

Surviving relatives can have different last names than the Territorial Guard members. Sometimes families don't realize their relative served in the unit or they don't know the member's date of birth, which is required.

"Sometimes it's like catching the wind," Angerman said.

She said the goal is to ultimately obtain a discharge for every member. Once families receive the documents, they qualify for a free headstone for the militia members from the National Cemetery Administration.

___

Follow Rachel D'Oro at https://twitter.com/rdoro .

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Today in History - Saturday, May 27, 2017

The Associated Press

Today is Saturday, May 27, the 147th day of 2017. There are 218 days left in the year.

Today's Highlight in History:

On May 27, 1937, the newly completed Golden Gate Bridge connecting San Francisco and Marin County, California, was opened to pedestrian traffic (vehicles began crossing the next day).

On this date:

In 1896, 255 people were killed when a tornado struck St. Louis, Missouri, and East St. Louis, Illinois.

In 1929, Charles A. Lindbergh Jr. married Anne Morrow in Englewood, New Jersey.

In 1933, the Chicago World's Fair, celebrating "A Century of Progress," officially opened. Walt Disney's Academy Award-winning animated short "The Three Little Pigs" was first released.

In 1935, the U.S. Supreme Court, in Schechter Poultry Corp. v. United States, unanimously struck down the National Industrial Recovery Act, a key component of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's "New Deal" legislative program.

In 1936, the Cunard liner RMS Queen Mary left England on its maiden voyage to New York. The first Aer Lingus flight took place as a de Havilland Dragon carried five passengers from Dublin to Bristol, England.

In 1941, the British Royal Navy sank the German battleship Bismarck off France with a loss of some 2,000 lives, three days after the Bismarck sank the HMS Hood with the loss of more than 1,400 lives. Amid rising world tensions, President Franklin D. Roosevelt proclaimed an "unlimited national emergency" during a radio address from the White House.

In 1942, Doris "Dorie" Miller, a cook aboard the USS West Virginia, became the first African-American to receive the Navy Cross for displaying "extraordinary courage and disregard for his own personal safety" during Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor.

In 1957, the single "That'll Be the Day" by Buddy Holly's group The Crickets was released by Brunswick Records.

In 1962, a dump fire in Centralia, Pennsylvania, ignited a blaze in underground coal deposits that continues to burn to this day.

In 1977, the punk rock single "God Save the Queen," the Sex Pistols' sardonic salute to Queen Elizabeth II, was released by Virgin Records.

In 1985, in Beijing, representatives of Britain and China exchanged instruments of ratification for an accord returning Hong Kong to Chinese control in 1997.

In 1998, Michael Fortier (FOR'-tee-ur), the government's star witness in the Oklahoma City bombing case, was sentenced to 12 years in prison after apologizing for not warning anyone about the deadly plot. (Fortier was freed in Jan. 2006.)

Ten years ago: American forces freed 42 kidnapped Iraqis in a raid on an al-Qaida hideout north of Baghdad. Dario Franchitti (DA'-ree-oh fran-KEE'-tee) won a rain-abbreviated Indy 500. Broadway actress Gretchen Wyler died in Camarillo, California, at age 75.

Five years ago: Syria strongly denied allegations that its forces had killed scores of people — including women and children — in Houla, but the U.N. Security Council condemned government forces for shelling residential areas. At the Cannes Film Festival, Austrian director Michael Haneke won the top prize for a second time with his stark film, "Amour." Dario Franchitti won the Indianapolis 500 for the third time. Johnny Tapia, the five-time boxing champion whose turbulent career was marked by cocaine addiction, alcohol, depression and run-ins with the law, was found dead at his Albuquerque, New Mexico, home; he was 45.

One year ago: President Barack Obama became the first American chief executive to visit Hiroshima, the city where the U.S. dropped the first atomic bomb during World War II, declaring it a fitting place to summon people everywhere to embrace the vision of a world without nuclear weapons. SpaceX pulled off another rocket landing, the third in just under two months, as the first-stage booster of the unmanned Falcon rocket settled vertically onto a barge 400 miles off Florida's east coast, eight minutes after the late afternoon liftoff.

Today's Birthdays: Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Herman Wouk (wohk) is 102. Former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger is 94. Former FBI Director William Sessions is 87. Author John Barth is 87. Actress Lee Meriwether is 82. Musician Ramsey Lewis is 82. Actor Louis Gossett Jr. is 81. Rhythm-and-blues singer Raymond Sanders (The Persuasions) is 78. Country singer Don Williams is 78. Actor Bruce Weitz is 74. Motion Picture Association of America Chairman Christopher Dodd is 73. Singer Bruce Cockburn (KOH'-burn) is 72. Singer-actress Dee Dee Bridgewater is 67. Actor Richard Schiff is 62. Singer Siouxsie Sioux (The Creatures, Siouxsie and the Banshees) is 60. Rock singer-musician Neil Finn (The Finn Brothers) is 59. Actress Peri Gilpin is 56. Actress Cathy Silvers is 56. Comedian Adam Carolla is 53. Actor Todd Bridges is 52. Rock musician Sean Kinney (Alice In Chains) is 51. Actor Dondre Whitfield is 48. Actor Paul Bettany is 46. Rock singer-musician Brian Desveaux (Nine Days) is 46. Country singer Jace Everett is 45. Actor Jack McBrayer is 44. Rapper Andre 3000 (Outkast) is 42. Rapper Jadakiss is 42. TV chef Jamie Oliver is 42. Alt-country singer-songwriter Shane Nicholson is 41. Actor Ben Feldman is 37. Actor Michael Steger is 37. Actor Darin Brooks is 33. Actor-singer Chris Colfer is 27. Actor Ethan Dampf is 23.

Thought for Today: "Every new opinion, at its starting, is precisely in a minority of one." — Thomas Carlyle, Scottish critic and historian (1795-1881).

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Update May 26, 2017

Stars turn out for lavish French Riviera AIDS fundraiser

Singer Nicki Minaj poses for photographers upon arrival at the amfAR charity gala. (Photo by Arthur Mola/Invision/AP)

Louise Dixon, Associated Press

CAP D'ANTIBES, France (AP) — A star-studded French Riviera AIDS fundraising gala has raised more than $20 million (17.8 million euros) to combat the disease globally.

Guests at the 24th annual amfAR Cinema Against AIDS gala were treated Thursday to musical performances by Nicki Minaj, Rita Ora and Diana Ross, a fashion show and auction of items for the superrich.

The lavish evening, which raises money for AIDS research and education programs across the globe, attracts some of world's biggest celebrities, including Leonardo DiCaprio, Eva Longoria, Will Smith, Nicole Kidman and David Beckham. Many are in the area for the Cannes Film Festival, which runs through Sunday.

Actor Jessica Chastain, left, and Will Smith.(Photo by Arthur Mola/Invision/AP)

The champagne-fueled dinner event included a fashion show that earned more than three million euros ($3.36 million) by itself.

This year's gala theme celebrated the "Golden Age of Hollywood."

Former soccer player David Beckham poses for photographers.(Photo by Arthur Mola/Invision/AP)

A chance to play soccer against Beckham sold for 350,000 euros ($392,000), the same price paid for a five-day trek to visit the Dalai Lama. A 1958 Jaguar XK150 sold for 600,000 euros (approximately $671,000).

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


1 step forward, 2 steps back for LBGT rights in Asia

In this Tuesday, May 23, 2017, file photo, a Shariah law official whips one of two men convicted of gay sex during a public caning outside a mosque in Banda Aceh, Aceh province Indonesia. (AP Photo/Heri Juanda, File)

The Associated Press

A first-ever ruling in favor of same-sex marriage in Asia. A public caning in Indonesia. A soldier convicted in South Korea.

For LGBT rights, it was one step forward, two steps back this week in Asia, where traditional values often clash with modern views on lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender issues.

The developments followed the arrest in Bangladesh last week of 27 men on suspicion of being gay, though police said they would be charged with drug possession since they were detained before they engaged in sex.

___

INDONESIA

First came a police raid on a gay sauna and gym in Jakarta, the Indonesian capital. Then the public caning of a gay couple for consensual sex in Aceh, a remote Indonesian province that practices Shariah law.

More than a thousand people packed a mosque courtyard Tuesday to witness the caning. The crowd shouted insults and cheered as the men, aged 20 and 23, winced in pain while they were whipped 83 times across the back.

"What they have done is like a virus that can harm people's morale," said Sarojini Mutia Irfan, a female university student who witnessed the caning. "This kind of public punishment is an attempt to stop the spread of the virus to other communities in Aceh."

Outside of Aceh, homosexuality is not illegal in Indonesia, but the country's LGBT community has come under siege in the past year.

Strident anti-gay comments from high-profile politicians and Islamic hard-liners have fanned prejudice. A case before the country's top court seeks to criminalize gay sex, as well as sex outside marriage.

Police detained 141 men Sunday evening at the sauna in Jakarta and charged 10 with violating pornography laws. The raid followed the arrest last month of 14 men in Indonesia's second-largest city, Surabaya, at what police say was a sex party.

The pressure looks set to increase. Police in West Java, the country's most populous province, announced Wednesday the creation of a task force to search for and monitor gyms and other locations that hold LGBT parties. The police chief urged communities to report such activity.

___

TAIWAN

A Taiwan court ruling Wednesday affirmed the right of same-sex couples to register their marriages, a first in Asia and one that will likely give encouragement to China's burgeoning gay rights movement, given the cultural ties between the two.

In this Wednesday, May 24, 2017, file photo, a protester of same-sex marriage holds a sign reading: "Same-sex marriage is unwelcome in Taiwan" (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying, File)

The Constitutional Court ruling also underscores the stark differences between self-governing Taiwan and China, which considers Taiwan a breakaway territory.

Taiwan has evolved into a freewheeling democracy over the past three decades with a vibrant civil society, a high proportion of women in politics — including the current president — and broad acceptance of international cultural values.

China, in contrast, remains an authoritarian society where the Communist Party brooks no challenge to its strict control over political and social life.

The removal of homosexuality from the official list of mental illnesses in 2001 and an end to routine harassment of gays meeting in public has made life easier for many. However, the ruling party's inherently conservative nature and strong societal pressure to marry and produce offspring remain impediments to greater freedoms.

Gay activists in China have become increasingly emboldened in recent years, staging small-scale public events and rallying behind unsuccessful legal cases on same-sex marriage and transgender rights, but they remain far from enjoying the high profile and legal protections of their counterparts in Taiwan.

"At least more Mandarin speakers can talk of equality," said Sean Howell, president of the international gay social network Hornet that has been campaigning for marriage equality in a number of Asian countries. "Achieving marriage equality in one country in Asia will help all around."

___

SOUTH KOREA

A South Korean military court sentenced an army captain Wednesday to a suspended prison term for having sex with a fellow male soldier.

The case was one of several that came to light last month, triggering allegations by a watchdog that South Korea's military was hunting down and prosecuting gay servicemen. South Korea's army has denied that, saying it was conducting a criminal investigation of soldiers who posted a video on the internet of two male soldiers having sex earlier this year.

Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people are harshly stigmatized and struggle to be politically visible in South Korea. A powerful Christian lobby immobilizes politicians seeking to pass anti-discrimination laws.

The stigma is amplified in the military, where most able-bodied South Korean men are required to serve about two years as the country maintains a large force in the face of potential conflict with North Korea. Gay men are not exempt from conscription but are banned from engaging in homosexual activity while serving, leading them to keep their identity secret for fear of discrimination and reprisals.

Kim In-sook, a lawyer for the captain, said the military penal code, which makes homosexual activity punishable by up to two years in prison, is unconstitutional because it tramples on basic human rights and dignity.

She said it's unclear whether her client would appeal because he felt tormented by the legal process. He will be dishonorably discharged if the ruling stands.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


UK bomber said to have pleaded 'Forgive me' before blast

People hold a minute of silence in a square in central Manchester, England, Thursday, May 25, 2017

Jill Lawless,Paisley Dodds,Maggie Michael, Gregory Katz, Associated Press

MANCHESTER, England (AP) — The suspect in the deadly Manchester concert bombing was driven by what he saw as unjust treatment of Arabs in Britain, a relative said Thursday, confirming he made a final phone call in which he pleaded: "Forgive me."

Salman Abedi was particularly upset by the killing last year of a Muslim friend whose death he believed went unnoticed by "infidels" in the U.K., said the relative, speaking on condition of anonymity over concerns for her own security.

"Why was there no outrage for the killing of an Arab and a Muslim in such a cruel way?" she asked. "Rage was the main reason," for the blast that killed 22 at the end of an Ariana Grande concert at Manchester Arena on Monday, she said, speaking by telephone from Libya.

The new insight into Abedi's motivation came as Britons faced stepped-up security, authorities pushed forward with raids and the investigation extended across Europe into Libya, where most of the suspected bomber's family lived.

The number of arrests in the U.K. ticked up to eight as British Transport Police said armed officers would begin patrols on some trains because of an increased threat of terrorism. Greater Manchester Police Chief Constable Ian Hopkins said, without elaborating, that searches of suspects' homes brought "very important" clues in the probe of the bombing. But leaks from the investigation were creating a trans-Atlantic diplomatic mess.

Manchester police halted their sharing of investigative information with the U.S. through most of Thursday until receiving fresh assurance there would be an end to leaks to the media.

British Prime Minister Theresa May, who spoke about the matter with U.S. President Donald Trump at a NATO summit in Brussels, said the countries' partnership on defense and security was built on trust. But "part of that trust is knowing that intelligence can be shared confidently," she said.

Trump pledged to "get to the bottom" of the leaks, calling them "deeply troubling" and asking the Justice Department and other agencies to "launch a complete review of this matter."

British officials were particularly angry over photos published by The New York Times showing remnants of a blue backpack which may have held the explosive. But it wasn't clear U.S. officials were the source of the images, which the Times defended as "neither graphic nor disrespectful of victims" and consistent with basic reporting "on weapons used in horrific crimes."

British security services were also upset that 22-year-old Abedi's name was apparently leaked by U.S. officials while police in the U.K. continued withholding it and while raids were underway in Manchester and in Libya. Hopkins said the leaks "caused much distress for families that are already suffering terribly with their loss."

Meanwhile, the investigation into the blast widened.

Authorities chased possible links between Abedi and militants in Manchester, elsewhere in Europe, and in North Africa and the Middle East. They were exploring potential ties to Abdalraouf Abdallah, a Libyan jailed in the U.K. for terror offenses, and to Raphael Hostey, an Islamic State recruiter killed in Syria.

Abedi's family remained a focus, too, with a brother in England, his father and another brother in Libya among those detained. Abedi's father was allegedly a member of the al-Qaida-backed Libyan Islamic Fighting group in the 1990s — a claim he denies.

An emerging portrait of the bomber remained complicated by competing assessments over whether Abedi held views that had sparked concern before the bombing.

Akram Ramadan, a member of the Libyan community in Manchester who attends the city's Didsbury Mosque, said Abedi was banned from the mosque after he allegedly interrupted an imam's anti-Islamic State sermon.

"He stood up and started calling the imam — 'You are talking bollocks,'" Ramadan said. "And he gave a good stare, a threatening stare into the imam's eyes."

Mohammed Fadl, a community leader, rejected that account. While Abedi's family was well-known in Manchester, Abedi himself did not attend many gatherings, Fadl said.

However, Fadl said he had heard Abedi's father took his son's passport away over concerns about his ties to alleged extremists and criminals.

"Very few people in the community here were close to him, and therefore Salman's fanaticism wasn't something the community was aware of," he said.

Ahmed bin Salem, a spokesman for the Special Deterrent Force in Libya, said Abedi placed his final call to both his mother and a brother. Abedi's relative said he had spoken with his brother only, asking that his message be relayed to his mother.

"He was giving farewell," bin Salem said.

Abedi's relative said the suspected bomber was pained by the killing of Abdel-Wahab Hafidah, an 18-year-old who news reports say was chased by a group of men, run over and stabbed in the neck in Manchester in May 2016.

"They wouldn't let you share bread with them," she said Abedi told her. "They are unjust to the Arabs."

Bin Salem said Abedi's mother told investigators her son left for the U.K. four days before the attack after spending a month in Libya. Based on the account from a younger brother, investigators think Abedi used the internet to learn how to make a bomb and "seek victory for the Islamic State," bin Salem said.

The allegations clashed with what Abedi's father said a day earlier in an interview with the AP. "We don't believe in killing innocents," Ramadan Abedi said before he was detained in Tripoli.

Around the U.K., many fell silent Thursday for a late-morning minute in tribute to the victims.

In Manchester's St. Ann's Square, where a sea of floral tributes grew by the hour, a crowd sang the hometown band Oasis' song "Don't Look Back in Anger." Queen Elizabeth II visited victims of the attack at Royal Manchester Children's Hospital, telling 14-year-old Evie Mills and her parents: "It's dreadful. Very wicked, to target that sort of thing."

Fifteen-year-old Millie Robson, wearing one of Grande's T-shirts, told the queen she had won VIP tickets to the pop star's concert. She recalled leaving the concert when the blast struck and remembered an intense ringing in her ears, but not being entirely aware that she was bleeding badly from her legs.

The teenager credited her father's quick action in picking her up and tying off her wounds to stem the bleeding.

"Compared to other people I'm quite lucky really," she said.

In addition to those killed, 116 people received medical treatment at Manchester hospitals for wounds from the blast. The National Health Service said 75 people were hospitalized.

___

Dodds and Katz reported from London; Michael reported from Cairo. Contributing to this report were Sylvia Hui in London, Rob Harris in Manchester, Frank Jordans in Berlin, Julie Pace in Brussels and Matt Sedensky in New York.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Monstrous cyclones churning over Jupiter's poles

This image made available by NASA on Thursday, May 25, 2017, and made from data captured by the Juno spacecraft shows Jupiter's south pole.(NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Betsy Asher Hall/Gervasio Robles via AP)

Marcia Dunn, AP Aerospace Writer

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Monstrous cyclones are churning over Jupiter's poles, until now a largely unexplored region that is more turbulent than scientists expected.

NASA's Juno spacecraft spotted the chaotic weather at the top and bottom of Jupiter once it began skimming the cloud tops last year, surprising researchers who assumed the giant gas planet would be relatively boring and uniform down low.

"What we're finding is anything but that is the truth. It's very different, very complex," Juno's chief scientist Scott Bolton of the Southwest Research Institute said Thursday.

With dozens of cyclones hundreds of miles across — alongside unidentifiable weather systems stretching thousands of miles — the poles look nothing like Jupiter's equatorial region, instantly recognizable by its stripes and Great Red Spot, a raging hurricane-like storm.

"That's the Jupiter we've all known and grown to love," Bolton said. "And when you look from the pole, it looks totally different ... I don't think anybody would have guessed this is Jupiter."

He calls these first major findings — published Thursday — "Earth-shattering. Or should I say, Jupiter-shattering."

Turning counter-clockwise in the northern hemisphere just like on Earth, the cyclones are clearly clustered near the poles. The diameters of some of these confirmed cyclones stretch up to 1,700 miles (2,800 kilometers). Even bigger, though shapeless weather systems are present in both polar regions. At the same time, the two poles don't really resemble each other, which is puzzling, according to Bolton.

Scientists are eager to see, over time, whether these super cyclones are stable or dynamic. "Are they going to stay the same way for years and years like the Great Red Spot ... Of course, only time will tell," Bolton said.

Just as intriguing will be how fast these super cyclones are moving.

Launched in 2011 and orbiting Jupiter since last summer, Juno is providing the best close-up views ever of our solar system's largest planet, peering beneath the clouds for a true portrait. It's made five close passes over Jupiter so far for science collection, the most recent last week; they occur about every two months given Juno's extremely oblong orbit. The next one will be in July, with investigators targeting the Great Red Spot.

Juno is moving so fast during these chummy encounters that it takes only two hours to get from the north pole to the south.

Besides polar cyclones, Juno has spotted white ice caps on Jupiter — frozen bits of ammonia and water. Bolton refers to them as Jovian snowfall — or maybe hail.

Juno also has detected an overwhelming abundance of ammonia deep down in Jupiter's atmosphere, and a surprisingly strong magnetic field in places — roughly 10 times greater than Earth's. It's also led scientists to believe Jupiter may have a "fuzzy" core — as Bolton puts it — big but partially dissolved.

Then there are the eerie sounds of plasma waves at Jupiter — "nature's music," according to Bolton. During the teleconference, he played two minutes of the spacecraft's recording from February, adjusted for the human ear and full of percussion sounds as well as high-pitched beeps and squeals, and even flute-like notes.

Results were published in Science and Geophysical Research Letters.

Jupiter's poles appear dramatically different from neighboring Saturn's, according to the scientists, with nothing like the hexagon-shaped cloud system over Saturn's north pole.

Researchers hope to compare Juno's observations with those of NASA's Cassini spacecraft, in its final months orbiting Saturn.

Juno's findings are "really going to force us to rethink not only how Jupiter works, but how do we explore Saturn, Uranus and Neptune," Bolton said.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Today in History - Friday, May 26, 2017

The Associated Press

Today is Friday, May 26, the 146th day of 2017. There are 219 days left in the year.

Today's Highlight in History:

On May 26, 1917, a tornado in central Illinois killed 101 people, mostly in the Mattoon-Charleston area.

On this date:

In 1521, Martin Luther was banned by the Edict of Worms (vohrms) because of his religious beliefs and writings.

In 1868, the impeachment trial of President Andrew Johnson ended with his acquittal on the remaining charges.

In 1897, the Gothic horror novel "Dracula" by Bram Stoker was first published in London.

In 1938, the House Un-American Activities Committee was established by Congress.

In 1940, Operation Dynamo, the evacuation of some 338,000 Allied troops from Dunkirk, France, began during World War II.

In 1942, the Tule (TOO'-lee) Lake Segregation Center for Japanese-American wartime internees opened in northern California. The U.S. War Department formally established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). Radio Tokyo boasted of recent victories in the Pacific War and declared that "the Japanese people can look forward to a triumphal march into London and a victory march in New York."

In 1954, explosions rocked the aircraft carrier USS Bennington off Rhode Island, killing 103 sailors. (The initial blast was blamed on leaking catapult fluid ignited by the flames of a jet.)

In 1960, U.N. Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge accused the Soviets during a meeting of the Security Council of hiding a microphone inside a wood carving of the Great Seal of the United States that had been presented to the U.S. Embassy in Moscow.

In 1972, President Richard M. Nixon and Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev signed the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty in Moscow. (The U.S. withdrew from the treaty in 2002.)

In 1977, George Willig scaled the outside of the South Tower of New York's World Trade Center; he was arrested at the top of the 110-story building.

In 1981, 14 people were killed when a Marine jet crashed onto the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz off Florida.

In 1991, a Lauda Air Boeing 767 crashed in Thailand, killing all 223 people aboard.

Ten years ago: Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki (NOO'-ree ahl-MAHL'-ih-kee), U.S. Ambassador Ryan Crocker and American commander Gen. David Petraeus flew to Iraq's blistering western desert in a rare joint outing to highlight gains there in the fight against insurgents.

Five years ago: Gruesome video posted online showed rows of dead Syrian children lying in a mosque in Houla, haunting images of what activists called one of the deadliest regime attacks yet in Syria's 14-month-old uprising. International space station astronauts floated into the Dragon, a day after its heralded arrival as the world's first commercial supply ship.

One year ago: President Barack Obama, visiting Japan, said foreign leaders were "rattled" by Donald Trump and had good reason to feel that way, as he accused the presumptive Republican presidential nominee of ignorance about world affairs. First lady Michelle Obama told graduates at a Native American high school in Santa Fe, New Mexico, to take pride in their history and cultures at a time when she said the "loudest voices in the national conversation" suggested turning away from the tribal values that were part of their education. Angela Paton, an actress best known for appearing with Bill Murray in "Groundhog Day," died in Oakland, California, at age 86.

Today's Birthdays: Sportscaster Brent Musberger is 78. Rock musician Garry Peterson (Guess Who) is 72. Singer Stevie Nicks is 69. Actress Pam Grier is 68. Actor Philip Michael Thomas is 68. Country singer Hank Williams Jr. is 68. British Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn is 68. Actress Margaret Colin is 59. Country singer-songwriter Dave Robbins is 58. Actor Doug Hutchison is 57. Actress Genie Francis is 55. Comedian Bobcat Goldthwait is 55. Singer-actor Lenny Kravitz is 53. Actress Helena Bonham Carter is 51. Distance runner Zola Budd is 51. Rock musician Phillip Rhodes is 49. Actor Joseph Fiennes (FYNZ) is 47. Singer Joey Kibble (Take 6) is 46. Actor-producer-writer Matt Stone is 46. Contemporary Christian musician Nathan Cochran is 39. Actress Elisabeth Harnois is 38. Actor Hrach Titizian is 38.

Thought for Today: "Life is a tragedy full of joy." — Bernard Malamud, American author (1914-1986).

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Update May 25, 2017

From fame to shame: Playmate to do time scrubbing graffiti

Playboy model Danielle "Dani" Mathers, center, leaves Los Angeles County Superior Court with her attorney Tom Mesereau, right, and her fiancÚ John Connor, Wednesday, May 24, 2017.(AP Photo/Reed Saxon)

Model and Playboy bunny Dani Mathers appears in Los Angeles County Superior Court. (Frederick M. Brown/Pool Photo via AP)

Brian Melley, Associated Press

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Dani Mathers earned fame posing as a nude model. She gained notoriety on the other side of the camera when she snapped a photo of an unwitting and unwilling subject — a naked 71-year-old woman in a gym locker room.

The firestorm of criticism that erupted after the Playboy model posted the pic online to mock the woman's body drew more attention than any centerfold of Mathers and led a judge Wednesday to order her to spend 30 days cleaning up graffiti on Los Angeles streets as punishment.

Mathers, 30, pleaded no contest to misdemeanor invasion of privacy in Los Angeles County Superior Court for the so-called body shaming case. Although she didn't admit guilt, the plea is recorded as a conviction.

The petite blonde, wearing a tight-fitting top, baggy trousers and a jacket, had apologized for taking the photo at an LA Fitness club in July and posting it on Snapchat with the caption: "If I can't unsee this then you can't either."

The posting was accompanied by a selfie of Mathers in a tank top with her hand over her mouth as if she's gasping in horror.

The 2015 Playmate of the Year contended she intended to send the photo privately to a friend and accidentally posted it publicly.

The crime was amplified by the attention the photo got online and the backlash that erupted in the world of social media, which is often quicker to punish than reward. The shamer quickly became the shamed.

Mathers lost modeling jobs and work as a radio host, her lawyers said. She complained of being bullied online.

She was relieved to put the case behind her and was grateful to be spared a jail term, defense attorney Thomas Mesereau said outside court.

"She really apologizes from the bottom of her heart for what happened," he said. "She never thought this would come out like this. Never intended to hurt anyone."

Mesereau blamed prosecutors for doing more damage to the victim by giving the case worldwide attention.

"There's a word for that and the word is baloney," Los Angeles City Attorney Mike Feuer replied when asked about that claim. "Body shaming can devastate its subject. People are mocked, they're humiliated and in ways they can never fully get back."

After the case arose, Feuer sponsored legislation to enhance penalties of the existing privacy invasion law for distributing partially or fully nude images without consent. The bill passed the state Senate this week.

Feuer criticized Mathers for fighting the case "tooth and nail" to avoid legal consequences. The defense argued unsuccessfully that the charge should be dismissed because the victim couldn't easily be identified in the photo shot from a distance.

It didn't take a great deal of detective work for the gym and police to track down the victim, who was humiliated when she learned of the photo, said Deputy City Attorney Chadd Kim.

Mathers was ordered to pay her $60 to replace a backpack seen in the photo so the woman wouldn't easily be identified.

The woman was not in court Wednesday, but Kim said that based on past conversations, she thought she'd be pleased with the outcome.

Under terms of the plea, Mathers will be on probation for three years.

She must also curtail her photo-taking. She was ordered not to take photos or video of people or post them online without their permission and can't have a camera in places where people might be naked or expect privacy.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Sri Lankan president discusses asylum seekers in Australia

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, center, greets the delegates as he arrives at UN celebration ceremony of Vesak or Buddha Purnima with Sri Lankan President Maithripala Sirisena, second left, and Sri Lankan Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe, left, in Colombo, Sri Lanka, Friday, May 12, 2017. (AP Photo/Eranga Jayawardena)

Rod McGuirk, Associated Press

CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Sri Lanka's president met with the Australian prime minister on Thursday with fighting people-smuggling high on the agenda.

President Maithripala Sirisena is making the first visit by a Sri Lankan head of state to Australia. His visit to Canberra and Sydney marks the 70th anniversary of diplomatic relations between the countries.

After meeting with Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, he was also scheduled to speak with Minister for Immigration and Border Protection Peter Dutton.

Sri Lankans, Iranians and Afghans are the largest national groups among more than 2,000 asylum seekers who are kept at Australia's expense on the Pacific island nations of Nauru and Papua New Guinea. But no Sri Lankan asylum seeker has reached Australia by boat since 2013.

"President Sirisena's visit will be an opportunity to advance key areas of bilateral cooperation, including education, defense, science and technology, economic development, medical research and the fight against people smuggling," Turnbull said in a statement before their meeting.

Sri Lankan Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe said during an Australian visit in February that Sri Lankan asylum seekers held on Pacific island camps who could potentially settle in the United States were free to return home without fear of persecution.

Sri Lankans, Iranians and Afghans are the largest national groups among more than 2,000 asylum seekers who are kept at Australia's expense on the Pacific islands nations of Nauru and Papua New Guinea. But no Sri Lankan asylum seeker has reached Australia by boat since 2013.

Australia refuses to resettle any of them and President Donald Trump has agreed to honor an Obama administration deal to resettle up to 1,250 of them. U.S officials have begun the process of assessing applicants for resettlement.

Sri Lanka has been reconciling its population since a bloody 26-year civil war ended in 2009.

Before becoming prime minister in January 2015, Wickremesinghe had accused Australia of turning a blind eye to human rights abuses in Sri Lanka in return for Sri Lankan government support in preventing asylum seekers from reaching Australia.

Sirisena this week used a Cabinet reshuffle to remove his country's foreign minister Mangala Samaraweera, who spearheaded a successful campaign to extricate Sri Lanka from possible international sanctions over war crime allegations from the country's long civil war.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Hawaii sues Ford, Nissan and Toyota over dangerous air bags

Stephen Levins, executive director of Hawaii's Office of Consumer Protection, gestures to photos of metal shards released when air bags exploded on Wednesday, May 24, 2017, in Honolulu. (AP Photo/Cathy Bussewitz)

Cathy Bussewitz, Associated Press

HONOLULU (AP) — Hawaii is suing auto manufacturers Ford, Nissan and Toyota over air bags that can spew shrapnel when they deploy.

The complaint filed Wednesday says the manufacturers knew or should have known for more than a decade that air bags installed in their cars posed serious and sometimes fatal danger.

The automakers used air bags made by Japanese manufacturer Takata. At least 16 people have been killed worldwide and more than 180 have been injured because of the defect, which led to the largest automotive recall in U.S. history.

"They used it because it was cheaper," said Stephen Levin, executive director of Hawaii's Office of Consumer Protection. "It saved a few dollars for the car manufacturers to market this dangerous product to consumers here in Hawaii despite publicly available information that ammonium nitrate, this is a chemical principally used to propel rockets...was volatile and unpredictable."

Levin compared the air bags to a hand grenade in the front of a car.

Spokesmen from Ford, Nissan and Toyota declined to comment on the lawsuit filed late Wednesday.

Hawaii residents are particularly vulnerable to defective air bags because the state's humid climate and temperature changes can accelerate chemical breakdown, making the air bags more likely to explode, Levin said.

However, many car owners are unable to replace the air bags immediately because the dealers don't have enough parts.

The lawsuit seeks damages of $10,000 per violation. It's unclear exactly how many Ford, Nissan and Toyota vehicles in Hawaii contain the air bags, but Levin estimates more than 30,000.

Hawaii was the first state to sue Takata and Honda over defective air bags last year. That case is ongoing, despite an effort by Takata to have it dismissed, Levin said.

New Mexico sued Takata and a long list of automakers in January.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


With an arched brow, Roger Moore found humor in Bond, life

British actor Roger Moore, playing the title role of secret service agent 007, James Bond, is shown on location in England in 1972. (AP Photo, File)

In this May 20, 1977 file photo, actor Roger Moore, alias British secret agent James Bond, is accompanied by co-star Barbara Bach as they arrive for the screening of their latest 007 feature, "The Spy Who Loved Me," during the Cannes Film Festival at the French Riviera.(AP Photo, File)

This is a Saturday, July 2, 2011 file photo of British actor Sir Roger Moore as he arrives at the Monaco palace for the religious wedding ceremony of Prince Albert II of Monaco and Charlene Princess of Monaco.(AP Photo/Michel Spingler, File)

Lindsey Bahr, AP Film Writer

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Sir Roger Moore always made sure to laugh at himself before the audience could.

With a mere arch of an eyebrow, Moore, whose wit was drier than James Bond's martinis, could convey a skepticism of his accidental profession, disarming good looks and the suave characters he often played, from Bond to Simon Templar, all while saving the day and charming a scantily clad girl in the process.

Sporting a posh accent and square jaw, Moore, who died Tuesday at age 89, looked the part of a movie star and a debonair international spy. But beneath the surface, the policeman's son from South London, a sickly child and plump kid who always chose a joke over a street fight, saw the inherent ridiculousness of 007 — and left an indelible mark on the role, and a generation, because of it.

"You can't be a real spy and have everybody in the world know who you are and what your drink is," Moore often said. "That's just hysterically funny."

A large part of his charm is that Moore never set out to be an actor. As a teenager, on a lark, he tagged along with some friends doing crowd work on the Vivien Leigh and Claude Raines film "Caesar and Cleopatra" and caught the eye of someone who thought he should meet the director,

"He said I think you should be trained. I said, 'Oh how wonderful,'" Moore recalled in an interview. "So I rushed home and told my mother I was going to be Stewart Granger."

Stardom did not come immediately, however. Moore toiled as a working actor, in television and films in the UK, and then in the U.S. as a studio contract player for MGM before breaking through in a few television roles, in "Maverick" and then "The Saint." The long-running show "The Saint" about the witty and charming romantic hero Simon Templar, many noted, was not unlike Moore himself — and would inform how he chose to play James Bond over the course of seven films, starting with "Live and Let Die" from 1973 and ending with "A View to a Kill" in 1985.

For many, "The Spy Who Loved Me," from 1977, is one of the greatest Bond films, and certainly the best for Moore — even though praise at the time was almost backhanded.

"Roger Moore is so enjoyably unflappable that you sometimes have to look closely to make sure he's still breathing," wrote critic Janet Maslin in the New York Times. "But his exaggerated composure amounts to a kind of backhanded liveliness. Though Mr. Moore doesn't compromise the character, he makes it amusingly clear that hedonism isn't all it's cracked up to be."

Moore knew his own shortcomings, and would joke about them readily. He liked to say that the difference between The Saint and James Bond was in the eyebrow.

"In 'The Saint' I did raise my eyebrow," Moore would say. "I don't think I ever raised my eyebrow in Bond ... except possibly when a bomb went off."

He spent a lot of his time talking about those eyebrows that some critics tried to lance him for, drolly explaining that he had only three emotions — one eyebrow raised, the other, or both.

"A lot of the time, I laugh at myself as a defense mechanism," Moore said, always aware that his "even features" were both an asset to stardom and an impediment to being considered a serious actor. There might have been some truth there. Though well-known, Moore never rose to prestige roles. Even in his most well-known part, as Bond, he was doomed to always be compared to his predecessor Sean Connery.

Moore accepted this fate with good humor, insisting throughout his life that Connery's Bond, more macho and a killer, is the definitive and best interpretation.

In fact, most of his accolades, including his knighthood, came from his work off-screen humanitarian with UNICEF, which he found through his friend Audrey Hepburn.

"He does not regard everything as a laugh, but he would die rather than let you see," said his friend Michael Caine.

But he carried on the act, like a good soldier, throughout his life. Even recently, when asked what audiences can expect from his well-reviewed one-man stage show, Moore hesitated only to laugh.

"Two hours good sleep," he said.

___

Follow AP Film Writer Lindsey Bahr on Twitter: www.twitter.com/ldbahr

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Today in History - Thursday, May 25, 2017

The Associated Press

Today is Thursday, May 25, the 145th day of 2017. There are 220 days left in the year.

Today's Highlight in History:

On May 25, 1977, the first "Star Wars" film (later renamed "Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope") was released by 20th Century Fox.

On this date:

In 1787, the Constitutional Convention began at the Pennsylvania State House (Independence Hall) in Philadelphia after enough delegates had shown up for a quorum.

In 1810, Argentina began its revolt against Spanish rule with the forming of the Primera Junta in Buenos Aires.

In 1916, the Chicago Tribune published an interview with Henry Ford in which the automobile industrialist was quoted as saying, "History is more or less bunk."

In 1935, Babe Ruth hit his last three career home runs — nos. 712, 713 and 714 — for the Boston Braves in a game against the Pittsburgh Pirates. (The Pirates won, 11-7.)

In 1942, U.S. Army Lt. Gen. Joseph Stilwell, frustrated over being driven out of Burma by Japanese forces during World War II, told reporters in Delhi, India: "I claim we got a hell of a beating."

In 1957, the third tube of the Lincoln Tunnel connecting New York and New Jersey was opened to traffic.

In 1961, President John F. Kennedy told Congress: "I believe that this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to the earth."

In 1968, the Gateway Arch in St. Louis was dedicated by Vice President Hubert Humphrey and Interior Secretary Stewart Udall.

In 1979, 273 people died when an American Airlines DC-10 crashed just after takeoff from Chicago's O'Hare Airport. Six-year-old Etan Patz (AY'-tahn payts) disappeared while on his way to a school bus stop in lower Manhattan. (In April 2017, former store clerk Pedro Hernandez, convicted of killing Etan, was sentenced to at least 25 years in prison.)

In 1981, daredevil Dan Goodwin, wearing a Spiderman costume, scaled the outside of Chicago's Sears Tower in 7 1/2 hours.

In 1986, an estimated 7 million Americans participated in "Hands Across America" to raise money for the nation's hungry and homeless.

In 1992, Jay Leno made his debut as host of NBC's "Tonight Show," succeeding Johnny Carson.

Ten years ago: President George W. Bush signed a bill to pay for military operations in Iraq that did not contain a timetable for troop withdrawals. Radical Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr (mook-TAH'-duh al SAH'-dur) resurfaced after nearly four months in hiding and demanded U.S. troops leave Iraq. Tony Award-winning actor Charles Nelson Reilly died in Los Angeles at age 76.

Five years ago: The private company SpaceX made history as its Dragon capsule docked with the International Space Station. In Syria, more than 100 people were killed in one day in a cluster of villages in central Homs province; U.N. investigators blamed pro-government gunmen for at least some of the killings, but the Syrian regime denied responsibility and blamed rebels for the deaths.

One year ago: President Barack Obama wrapped up his historic visit to Vietnam before heading to Japan, the site of a two-day summit of wealthy nations. It was announced that Texas and 10 other states were suing the Obama administration over its directive to U.S. public schools to let transgender students use the bathrooms and locker rooms that matched their gender identity. (The other states were Oklahoma, Alabama, Wisconsin, West Virginia, Tennessee, Maine, Arizona, Louisiana, Utah and Georgia.) Actor Johnny Depp's wife, actress Amber Heard, filed for divorce in Los Angeles, citing irreconcilable differences after 15 months of marriage.

Today's Birthdays: Actress Ann Robinson is 88. Former White House news secretary Ron Nessen is 83. Country singer-songwriter Tom T. Hall is 81. Actor Sir Ian McKellen is 78. Country singer Jessi Colter is 74. Actress-singer Leslie Uggams is 74. Movie director and Muppeteer Frank Oz is 73. Actress Karen Valentine is 70. Actress Jacki Weaver is 70. Rock singer Klaus Meine (The Scorpions) is 69. Actress Patti D'Arbanville is 66. Playwright Eve Ensler is 64. Musician Cindy Cashdollar is 62. Actress Connie Sellecca is 62. Rock singer-musician Paul Weller is 59. Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., is 57. Actor-comedian Mike Myers is 54. Actor Matt Borlenghi is 50. Actor Joseph Reitman is 49. Rock musician Glen Drover is 48. Actress Anne Heche (haych) is 48. Actresses Lindsay and Sidney Greenbush (TV: "Little House on the Prairie") are 47. Actor-comedian Jamie Kennedy is 47. Actress Octavia Spencer is 47. Actor Justin Henry is 46. Rapper Daz Dillinger is 44. Actress Molly Sims is 44. Singer Lauryn Hill is 42. Actress Erinn Hayes is 41. Actor Cillian Murphy is 41. Actor Ethan Suplee (soo-PLEE') is 41. Rock musician Todd Whitener is 39. Actor Corbin Allred is 38. Actress-singer Lauren Frost is 32. Musician Guy Lawrence (Disclosure) is 26. Olympic gold medal gymnast Aly Raisman is 23.

Thought for Today: "A historian is a prophet in reverse." — Friedrich von Schlegel, German diplomat and writer (1772-1829).

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Update May 24, 2017

Parents weigh in on concert fears after Manchester

People attend a vigil in Albert Square, Manchester.
(AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

Leanne Italie, Associated Press

Iris Azulai's 17-year-old daughter, Carmel, recently attended a large concert in Tel Aviv of the Argentine singer Lali. Given Israel's history, the fear of terrorism is always lurking, particularly at mass events, but regardless, she would not have prevented her daughter from going.

"There is always that fear ... but I allow her to go because I say we cannot allow terrorism to take over our lives," the mother said Tuesday following the Ariana Grande tragedy in Manchester, England. "It can happen anywhere and I just ask my daughter to be aware and take note of her surroundings."

Before a suicide bomber struck in the north of England on Monday, young Grande fans at the 21,000-seat Manchester Arena posted photos on social media with messages of excitement at seeing their 23-year-old, high-ponytailed idol live. But now, some parents are thinking carefully about their children's summer plans to attend concerts.

"The worst part is that if something happens there is nowhere to run and nowhere to hide. All these things pass through my mind when she is there," Azulai said.

Among those killed in Manchester was 8-year-old Saffie Roussos. She was the youngest of the 22 dead identified so far.

"The thought that anyone could go out to a concert and not come home is heartbreaking," said Chris Upton, the head teacher at Saffie's school, Tarleton Community Primary School in the village of Tarleton, Lancashire.

For many families and kids, concert going — especially freewheeling summer shows around the world — are a rite of passage, a step toward independence. Count American singer and songwriter Victoria Monet, 24, in that demographic.

She was among two opening acts for Grande on the European leg of Grande's Dangerous Woman Tour. Monet told her 43,100 followers on Twitter after the deadly explosion in Manchester that the "ones who came to have the night of their lives ended up losing them."

Monet added: "They weren't safe. I will never understand this hate! I don't know how to handle this and I can't smile and I feel useless I'm sorry."

Julie Dearing in Houston, Texas, has a boy and girl, a 13-year-old son not at all interested in concerts and an 11-year-old music lover who was, until she learned of the Manchester attack. Earlier this year, Dearing's daughter watched Fifth Harmony and other acts perform at Houston's NRG Stadium, which has a capacity of nearly 80,000.

"That was her first concert," Dearing said. "I wasn't worried then, but I am now. I don't know that I would let her go to a concert now and I don't anticipate her asking again, at least not for a long time. She expressed to me she no longer has a desire to attend a large concert after hearing this news. It was very frightening, understandably so."

Dearing's daughter, Alyssa Dearing, put it this way: "I don't think I'm afraid. I'm just more cautious. I'd be kind of on edge, like not really 100 percent sure of everything."

Will that anxiety carry over to the mall, getting around by herself or with friends and other independent outings?

"I think it's so associated with concerts more than anything else," the elder Dearing said. "I think she'll be fine but I'd rather err on the side of caution."

As anxiety-inducing as concert going by kids can be, whether parents attend or not, Los Angeles licensed psychologist Crystal I. Lee sees no upside in letting fear take over.

"Car accidents are more likely to harm your child than a terrorist attack, yet you still allow your child to travel by car," she said. "Of course, continue to exercise your general good judgment when deciding if your child should go, but don't let the possibility of terrorism be the deciding factor."

Easier said than done for some parents, especially those in Paris and other cities that have been targeted by terrorists in recent years.

Paris resident Shelley Boyd Cadiou's three sons — the youngest of whom is 18 — were going to attend a Guns N' Roses concert in Paris on July 7 at the Stade de France, one of the targets in the November 2015 Paris violence that left 130 people died. They're no longer attending because of jitters over the Manchester attack.

"I don't think I would ever veto a concert if my children really wanted to go but I will always be relieved if they decide for whatever reason not to be in crowds," Boyd Cadiou said.

The November attacks included the Bataclan concert hall, where most of the carnage occurred.

"I try to not let my anxiety touch other people but the Bataclan event was very traumatic for me," Boyd Cadiou said.

Jerrid Anderson, who recently moved to Paris from Minnesota, planned to take his 19-year-old daughter, Hannah, to the Guns N' Roses show but decided immediately against it Tuesday morning because of Manchester. His wife, Danielle Anderson, said that she was against his decision to cancel but let it stand.

"I don't think we should live our life in fear. I don't really care if my husband and children go to a rock concert, but what I don't want is to box in our lives out of fear of terrorism," she said.

Aron Heller in Jerusalem and Thomas Adamson in Paris contributed to this report.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Warning of "imminent" attack, Britain raises threat level

 

A man lights candles after a vigil in Albert Square, Manchester.
(AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

Jill Lawless,Rob Harris & Sylvia Hui, Associated Press

MANCHESTER, England (AP) — As officials hunted for accomplices of a suicide bomber and Britain's prime minister warned another attack could be "imminent," thousands of people poured into the streets of Manchester in a defiant vigil Tuesday for victims of a blast at a pop concert — the latest apparent target of Islamic extremists seeking to rattle life in the West.

The attack left at least 22 dead, including an 8-year-old girl, shattering the revelry at a show by American singer Ariana Grande, where strains of electric pop and the sways of innocent young fans quickly gave way to an explosion, a flood of screams and a stampede of panicked concert-goers, many clutching pink balloons and wearing the kitten-ear headbands popularized by Grande.

Touching on that disconnect, British Prime Minister Theresa May said: "We struggle to comprehend the warped and twisted mind that sees a room packed with young children not as a scene to cherish but as an opportunity for carnage."

A woman holds her dog before placing flowers after a vigil in Albert Square. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

May said Britain's terror threat level had been raised to critical — meaning another attack may be imminent. The status means armed soldiers could be deployed instead of police at public events including sports matches. The threat level had been at the second-highest rung of "severe" for several years.

The Islamic State group claimed responsibility for the blood bath Monday, though a top American intelligence official said the assertion could not be verified. Manchester Police Chief Ian Hopkins identified the bomber as 22-year-old Salman Abedi, who authorities said died in the attack. Police raided two sites in the northern English city, setting off a controlled explosion in one, and arresting a 23-year-old man in a third location.

May said Abedi was born and raised in Britain and a European security official said he was of Libyan descent. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to comment on ongoing investigations.

At least 20 heavily armed, helmeted police surrounded a modest red brick house listed as Abedi's address in a mixed Manchester suburb at midday on Tuesday and blasted down the door.

"It was so quick. These cars just pulled up and all these police with guns, dogs, jumped out of the car and said to us: 'Get in the house now,'" said Simon Turner, 46, who lives nearby. Later, forensic officers in white coveralls were seen going in and out of the property.

Details on Abedi were slow to trickle out. He was described by neighbors as a tall, thin young man who often wore traditional Islamic dress, but few said they knew him well.

Alan Kinsey, 52, who lives across the street, said his neighbor would often get picked up by another young man in a Toyota and often returned late at night. "I thought he worked in a takeaway or something" because of his late hours, Kinsey said.

People gesture as they attend a vigil in Trafalgar Square, London Tuesday May 23, 2017 for the victims of the attack.
(Victoria Jones/PA via AP)

Police also searched an apartment in a nearby area that British media reported belonged to Abedi's brother, Ismail.

Late Tuesday, thousands of people, some holding up signs proclaiming "I Love MCR" — an abbreviation for Manchester — held a moment of silence at a vigil for the victims. Lord Mayor Eddy Newman and the city's police chief were among the speakers in front of City Hall in Albert Square, where a banner with a website for a Muslim group said "Love for all, Hatred for None."

May called raising the country's terror threat level and deploying soldiers to patrol key sites a "proportionate and sensible response" to the suicide bombing. There are two major sports events in London on Saturday, with Wembley Stadium hosting soccer's FA Cup final, which Prince William is due to attend, and Twickenham hosting rugby's Premiership final.

British Prime Minister Theresa May departs 10 Downing Street, London, to go to Manchester, Tuesday May 23, 2017. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

Monday's bombing made Manchester Arena, one of the largest indoor concert venues in Europe, the latest apparent target of Islamic extremists striking at the heart of Western culture, an ideology baffling to the panicked young faces emerging from the concert.

Among those confirmed killed was Georgina Callander, whose death was reported by her former school, which posted a photo of her in her school uniform on its website and described her as a "lovely" and "very popular" young woman. Also killed was 8-year-old Saffie Roussos, who a teacher called "simply a beautiful little girl in every aspect of the word" who was warm, kind, "and unassuming, with a creative flair."

The little girl's mother and sister were among the 59 wounded, which included at least 12 children under the age of 16.

Grande, who was not injured in the blast, tweeted: "broken. from the bottom of my heart, i am so so sorry. i don't have words."

The bombing took place after Grande closed the show with "Dangerous Woman" and left the stage and the audience streamed toward the city's main train station. It scattered bolts and other metal scraps, apparently intended to maximize the bloodshed. People tumbled over guardrails and one another clawing toward an escape.

"There was this massive bang. And then everyone just went really quiet. And that's when the screaming started," said 25-year-old Ryan Molloy. "As we came outside to Victoria Station, there were just people all over the floor covered in blood."

The attack sparked a nightlong search for loved-ones — parents for the children they had accompanied or had been waiting to pick up, and friends for each other after groups were scattered by the blast. Twitter and Facebook lit up with heartbreaking appeals for the missing.

"I've called the hospitals. I've called all the places, the hotels where people said that children have been taken and I've called the police," Charlotte Campbell tearfully told ITV television's Good Morning Britain breakfast show. Campbell's 15-year-old daughter, Olivia, had attended the show with a friend who was wounded and being treated in a hospital.

"She's not turned up," Campbell said of her daughter. "We can't get through to her."

Hayley Lunt, who brought her 10-year-old daughter Abigail to the show, her very first concert, said they ran as fast as they could once the explosions rang out. "What should have been a superb evening," Lunt said, "is now just horrible."

Some concert-goers said security had been haphazard before the show, with some people being searched and others not. However, authorities would not say whether the bomber blew himself up inside or outside the arena, so it wasn't clear if rigorous bag screening or additional security would have helped prevent the deaths and injuries. The venue tweeted on Monday night that it happened "outside the venue in a public space."

Around the United Kingdom and across Europe, the attack brought fear and mourning.

At Buckingham Palace, Queen Elizabeth II marked a moment of silence alongside her husband Prince Philip as well as Prince Charles and his wife Camilla. In Rome, the lights of the Colosseum and Trevi Fountain were darkened.

U.S. President Donald Trump, on a visit to the West Bank city of Bethlehem, called the perpetrators "evil losers" and said "this wicked ideology must be obliterated."

Manchester, 160 miles (260 kilometers) northwest of London, is one of Britain's largest cities. The attack was the deadliest in Britain since four suicide bombers killed 52 London commuters on subway trains and a bus in 2005.

Islamic State's claim of responsibility echoed others the group has made for attacks in the West but with vague details that left open the possibility it was an opportunistic attempt at propaganda. Manchester itself has seen terror before, but not this deadly. The city was hit by a huge Irish Republican Army bomb in 1996 that leveled a swath of the city center. More than 200 people were injured, although no one was killed.

The bombing also elicited painful memories of the 2015 terror attacks in Paris, where most of the 130 killed were at the Bataclan concert hall.

Hui reported from London. Contributing to this report were Gregory Katz, Brian Rohan, Paisley Dodds, Lisa Leff and Sophie Berman in London; John Leicester and Lori Hinnant in Paris; Eric Tucker in Washington; and Matt Sedensky in New York.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Uber admits stiffing NYC drivers by millions of dollars

Tom McElroy

NEW YORK (AP) — Uber on Tuesday admitted to underpaying its New York City drivers tens of millions of dollars for the past 2 1/2 years.

"We are committed to paying every driver every penny they are owed — plus interest — as quickly as possible," Uber executive Rachel Holt said in a statement. "We are working hard to regain driver trust, and that means being transparent, sticking to our word, and making the Uber experience better from end to end."

The ride-hailing company said each affected driver would get a refund of about $900, which includes interest. Uber did not give an exact figure on how many drivers it has in the city, but said it was in the tens of thousands.

The company said it had mistakenly continued to calculate its commission based on the gross fare, before any taxes and fees were deducted. The company will now calculate its commission based on the net fare, which is in line with its updated national driver policy enacted in November 2014.

The union that represents Uber drivers welcomed the announcement, but said the company owes its drivers more than its claiming.

"Uber is using the difference in the commission it wrongly took from drivers, rather than reimburse the drivers the full tax and surcharge amounts they are owned back — a difference of nearly 10 percent," Bhairavi Desai, executive director of the New York Taxi Workers Alliance.

"This payout is an attempt by Uber to pull a fast one to avoid court oversight and shortchange drivers in the process," said Desai, whose organization has filed several lawsuits against the San Francisco-based company.

It's been a tumultuous year for Uber, which has been hit with lawsuits, allegations of sexual harassment, a federal investigation into claims that it has used a fake version of its app to thwart authorities and accusations of trade theft.

In February, a video emerged of CEO Travis Kalanick arguing with an Uber driver. It includes yelling and profanity and ends with a combative Kalanick dismissing the agitated driver's claims that sharp reductions in fares forced him into bankruptcy.

Kalanick later conceded he needed leadership help.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Search resumes for 7 missing after fatal bus plunge in India

NEW DELHI (AP) — Rescuers have resuming searching for seven people missing after a bus plunged into a river in mountainous northern India, killing at least 17 Hindu pilgrims.

Six people who were injured in the crash Tuesday were hospitalized.

Police officer Mahadev Uniyal said Wednesday that rescuers recovered 16 bodies and one person died in the hospital. The search had been halted overnight.

The bus plunged nearly 380 feet (150 meters) into a river in Uttarakhand state, nearly 400 kilometers (250 miles) northeast of New Delhi. The cause wasn't known.

Uttarakhand state is a popular summer vacation destination for tourists seeking to escape the torrid heat of India's plains. It is also a religious pilgrimage site with four temple towns in the Garhwal Himalayan range.

More than 110,000 people are killed annually on India's roads. Most crashes are attributed to reckless driving, poorly maintained roads and aging vehicles.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Today in History - Wednesday, May 24, 2017

The Associated Press

Today is Wednesday, May 24, the 144th day of 2017. There are 221 days left in the year.

Today's Highlight in History:

On May 24, 1775, John Hancock was unanimously elected President of the Continental Congress in Philadelphia, succeeding Peyton Randolph.

On this date:

In 1844, Samuel F.B. Morse transmitted the message "What hath God wrought" from Washington to Baltimore as he formally opened America's first telegraph line.

In 1883, the Brooklyn Bridge, linking Brooklyn and Manhattan, was dedicated by President Chester Alan Arthur and New York Gov. Grover Cleveland.

In 1935, the first major league baseball game to be played at night took place at Cincinnati's Crosley Field as the Reds beat the Philadelphia Phillies, 2-1.

In 1937, in a set of rulings, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of the Social Security Act of 1935.

In 1941, the German battleship Bismarck sank the British battle cruiser HMS Hood in the North Atlantic, killing all but three of the 1,418 men on board.

In 1957, anti-American rioting broke out in Taipei, Taiwan, over the acquittal of a U.S. Army sergeant who had shot and killed a Chinese man.

In 1962, astronaut Scott Carpenter became the second American to orbit the Earth as he flew aboard Aurora 7.

In 1976, Britain and France opened trans-Atlantic Concorde supersonic transport service to Washington.

In 1977, in a surprise move, the Kremlin ousted Soviet President Nikolai Podgorny from the Communist Party's ruling Politburo.

In 1980, Iran rejected a call by the World Court in The Hague to release the American hostages.

In 1994, four Islamic fundamentalists convicted of bombing New York's World Trade Center in 1993 were each sentenced to 240 years in prison.

In 2001, 23 people were killed when the floor of a Jerusalem wedding hall collapsed beneath dancing guests, sending them plunging several stories into the basement.

Ten years ago: Bowing to President George W. Bush, Congress passed an emergency war spending bill that did not include a provision ordering troops home from Iraq beginning in the fall of 2007. Ohio death row inmate Christopher Newton was executed by injection; it took him 16 minutes to die, more than twice the usual amount of time, once chemicals began flowing into his veins, which the execution team had trouble locating.

Five years ago: President Barack Obama doubled down on criticism of rival Mitt Romney's background as a venture capitalist, telling a rally at the Iowa State Fairgrounds there might be value in such experience but "not in the White House." Brian Banks, a former high school football star whose dreams of a pro career were shattered by what turned out to be a false rape accusation, burst into tears as a judge in Long Beach, California, threw out the charge that had sent Banks to prison for more than five years.

One year ago: Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton and presumptive Republican nominee Donald Trump each won primaries in Washington state. Protests outside a Donald Trump rally in Albuquerque, New Mexico, turned violent as demonstrators threw burning T-shirts, plastic bottles and other items at police officers, overturned trash cans and knocked down barricades.

Today's Birthdays: Actor-comedian-impressionist Stanley Baxter is 91. Jazz musician Archie Shepp is 80. Comedian Tommy Chong is 79. Singer Bob Dylan is 76. Actor Gary Burghoff is 74. Singer Patti LaBelle is 73. Actress Priscilla Presley is 72. Country singer Mike Reid is 70. Actor Jim Broadbent is 68. Actor Alfred Molina is 64. Singer Rosanne Cash is 62. Actor Cliff Parisi is 57. Actress Kristin Scott Thomas is 57. Rock musician Jimmy Ashhurst (Buckcherry) is 54. Rock musician Vivian Trimble is 54. Actor John C. Reilly is 52. Actor Dana Ashbrook is 50. Actor Eric Close is 50. Actor Carl Payne is 48. Rock musician Rich Robinson is 48. Actor Dash Mihok is 43. Actor Bryan Greenburg is 39. Actor Owen Benjamin is 37. Actor Billy L. Sullivan is 37. Actor-rapper Jerod Mixon (aka Big Tyme) is 36. Rock musician Cody Hanson (Hinder) is 35. Dancer-choreographer-singer Mark Ballas is 31. Country singer Billy Gilman is 29. Rapper/producer G-Eazy is 28. Actress Brianne Howey (TV: "The Exorcist") is 28. Actor Cayden Boyd is 23.

Thought for Today: "It is the weakness and danger of republics, that the vices as well as virtues of the people are represented in their legislation." — Helen Maria Hunt Jackson, American author (1830-1885).

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Update May 23, 2017

19 confirmed dead in explosion at Grande concert

Police work at Manchester Arena after reports of an explosion at the venue during an Ariana Grande gig in Manchester.(Peter Byrne/PA via AP)

Gregory Katz, Associated Press

LONDON (AP) — An explosion struck an Ariana Grande concert in northern England late Monday, killing at least 19 people and injuring dozens in what police say they are treating as a terrorist attack.

Greater Manchester Police said 19 people were confirmed dead and roughly 50 were injured by the explosion at Manchester Arena. Emergency vehicles were helping the injured and bomb disposal units were later seen outside the venue.

There was mass panic after the explosion at the end of the concert, which was part of Grande's The Dangerous Woman Tour. The singer was not injured, according to a representative.

Britain's terrorist threat level has been set at "severe" in recent years indicating an attack is highly likely. Police said the explosion is being judged a terrorist attack unless new information proves otherwise.

Witnesses reported hearing two loud bangs coming from near the arena's bars at about 10:35 p.m. but there were few further details.

"A huge bomb-like bang went off that hugely panicked everyone and we were all trying to flee the arena," concertgoer Majid Khan, 22, told Britain's Press Association. "It was one bang and essentially everyone from the other side of the arena where the bang was heard from suddenly came running towards us as they were trying to exit."

Added Oliver Jones, 17: "The bang echoed around the foyer of the arena and people started to run."

(Peter Byrne/PA via AP)

Video from inside the arena showed concertgoers screaming as they made their way out amid a sea of pink balloons.

British Prime Minister Theresa May said the government is working to establish "the full details of what is being treated by the police as an appalling terrorist attack."

She said her thoughts are with the victims and the families of those who have been affected. The government is expected to call an emergency Cabinet meeting.

If the incident is confirmed as a terrorist attack it would be the most deadly in Britain since the London subway bombings in 2005.

Police advised the public to avoid the area around the Manchester Arena, and the train station near the arena, Victoria Station, was evacuated and all trains canceled.

(Peter Byrne/PA via AP)

Joseph Carozza, a representative from Grande's U.S. record label, said the singer is OK and they are investigating what happened.

The Dangerous Woman Tour is the third concert tour by Grande and supports her third studio album, "Dangerous Woman."

Grande's role as Cat Valentine on Nickelodeon's high school sitcom "Victorious" propelled her to teen idol status, starting in 2010.

In this Sept. 24, 2016 file photo, Ariana Grande performs at the 2016 iHeartRadio Music Festival in Las Vegas.(Photo by John Salangsang/Invision/AP, File)

The 23-year-old Grande, with her signature high ponytail, went on to also star in spinoffs that included "iCarly," as she worked to develop her recording career.

The tour began in Phoenix in February. After Manchester, Grande was to perform at venues in Europe, including Belgium, Poland, Germany, Switzerland and France, with concerts in Latin America and Asia to follow.

(Peter Byrne/PA via AP)

AP Music Writer Mesfin Fekadu contributed to this story from Jersey City, New Jersey.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Reaction to Manchester explosion at Ariana Grande concert

In this Aug. 28, 2016 file photo, Ariana Grande arrives at the MTV Video Music Awards in New York. (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP, File)

The Associated Press

Reaction to the fatal explosion at an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England:

"broken. from the bottom of my heart, i am so so sorry. i don't have words." — Ariana Grande, via Twitter.

"My thoughts, prayers and tears for all those affected by the Manchester tragedy tonight. I'm sending all my love." — pop star Taylor Swift, via Twitter

"Praying for everyone at @ArianaGrande's show" — pop star Katy Perry, via Twitter

"Stunned by the news coming in from the UK. my thoughts are with the fans and families at Ariana's Manchester show. Awful" — TV producer, host Ryan Seacrest, via Twitter

"Sending love to those affected in Manchester." — singer Ellie Goulding, via Twitter

"Tearing up imagining innocent concert goers losing their lives..praying for everyone and all #arianators." — pop star Demi Lovato, via Twitter

"I don't wanna believe that the world we live in could be so cruel." — pop star Bruno Mars, via Twitter

"I'm heartbroken over what happened in Manchester tonight." — pop star Harry Styles, former member of One Direction, via Twitter

"My heart hurts for my sister, Ariana & every family affected by this tragic event in the U.K. Innocent lives lost. I'm so sorry to hear this" — star rapper-singer Nicki Minaj, via Twitter

"Heart breaks for everyone at the @ArianaGrande show- terrorism and hatred disrupting a magical escapist experience. Sending all love." — actress Lena Dunham, via Twitter

"My thoughts and prayers go out to everyone affected in Manchester." — pop star Selena Gomez, via Twitter

"MY PRAYERS GO OUT TO PPL OF MANCHESTER.HAD SPECIAL TIMES THERE FROM YOUTH & BEYOND" — music legend Cher, via Twitter

"Just saw the news about Manchester... Our hearts are breaking .. Prayers for all who attended, their families, Ari and her whole crew." — singing group Fifth Harmony, via Twitter

"every musician feels sick & responsible tonight_shows should be safe for you. truly a worst nightmare. sending love to manchester & ari" — singer Lorde, via Twitter

"Our prayers and strengh to the victims and their families involved in this tragedy in Manchester. Stay strong. @ArianaGrande" — actor Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson, via Twitter

"So desperately sad about Manchester." — pop star Boy George, via Twitter

"Deeply saddened by the tragic events in Manchester. Our thoughts are with everyone affected." — Apple CEO Tim Cook, via Twitter

"Not trying to #ThoughtsAndPrayers up a self serving tweet. But that #Manchester explosion man...man. The hell is goin on in this world." — drummer-bandleader Questlove, via Twitter

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Asian shares drift as blast in Manchester rattles investors

 

The American flag flies above the Wall Street entrance to the New York Stock Exchange.(AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)

Elaine Kurtenbach, AP Business Writer

TOKYO (AP) — Asian shares were mostly higher in early trading Tuesday after police said they were treating an explosion in Manchester, England, that killed at least 19 people as a terror attack. Oil prices fell back after Monday's rally.

KEEPING SCORE: Japan's Nikkei 225 edged 0.2 percent lower to 19,648.09 and the Shanghai Composite Index fell 0.4 percent to 3,062.85. But other markets were mostly higher. Hong Kong's Hang Seng index rose 0.2 percent to 25,431.47 and the S&P ASX 200 of Australia was flat at 5,771.60. South Korea's Kospi gained 0.3 percent to 2,310.02. Markets in Southeast Asia were higher.

WALL STREET: Stocks rose for the third straight day with technology companies closing in on all-time highs, led by big names like Cisco Systems and Qualcomm. Aerospace and defense companies rose after President Donald Trump presided over a $110 billion sale of military equipment to Saudi Arabia that could expand to $350 billion over 10 years. The Standard & Poor's 500 index jumped 0.5 percent to 2,394.02. The Dow Jones industrial average 0.4 percent to 20,894.83 and the Nasdaq composite gained 0.8 percent to 6,133.62.

MANCHESTER BLAST: The explosion struck an Ariana Grande concert in northern England late Monday, killing at least 19 people and injuring dozens. The singer was not injured. Britain's terrorist threat level has been set at "severe" in recent years, indicating an attack is highly likely. Police said the explosion is being judged a terrorist attack unless new information proves otherwise.

ANALYST'S VIEWPOINT: "The recovery in U.S. markets remains underway while the latest development in Manchester threatens to derail the positive lead for markets in the Asia-Pacific region," Jingyi Pan of IG said in a commentary.

ENERGY: Benchmark U.S. crude oil lost 10 cents to $51.03 a barrel in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. On Monday it added 46 cents to $51.13 a barrel. Brent crude, used to price international oils, fell 16 cents to $53.71 a barrel.

CURRENCIES: The dollar declined to 111.07 yen from 111.34 yen. The euro rose to $1.1252 from $1.1237.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Disruptive passenger in Trump cap delays Shanghai flight

 

File Photo (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, File)

BEIJING (AP) — United Airlines says a disruptive passenger on a flight from Shanghai to New Jersey was asked to get off, resulting in an unscheduled stop in San Francisco and an arrival delayed by eight hours.

Videos on social media showed an unidentified man wearing a red "Make America Great Again" cap heatedly insisting that he was entitled to a seat and yelling at fellow passengers. The caps were popular in President Donald Trump's campaign.

Passenger Clark Gredona wrote on Facebook that the man felt entitled to several seats next to him because he could not get an upgrade.

Gredona wrote that police persuaded the man to leave without incident, adding that United crew handled the matter "professionally."

Videos showed angry passengers chanting "lock him up" as the man was escorted away.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Today in History - Tuesday, May 23, 2017

The Associated Press

Today is Tuesday, May 23, the 143rd day of 2017. There are 222 days left in the year.

Today's Highlight in History:

On May 23, 1967, Egypt closed the Straits of Tiran to Israeli shipping, an action which helped precipitate war between Israel and its Arab neighbors the following month.

On this date:

In 1430, Joan of Arc was captured by the Burgundians, who sold her to the English.

In 1533, the marriage of England's King Henry VIII to Catherine of Aragon was declared null and void by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Cranmer.

In 1788, South Carolina became the eighth state to ratify the United States Constitution.

In 1814, a third version of Beethoven's only opera, "Fidelio," had its world premiere in Vienna.

In 1915, Italy declared war on Austria-Hungary during World War I.

In 1934, bank robbers Clyde Barrow and Bonnie Parker were shot to death in a police ambush in Bienville Parish, Louisiana.

In 1937, industrialist and philanthropist John D. Rockefeller, founder of the Standard Oil Co. and the Rockefeller Foundation, died in Ormond Beach, Florida, at age 97.

In 1939, the Navy submarine USS Squalus sank during a test dive off the New England coast. Thirty-two crew members and one civilian were rescued, but 26 others died; the sub was salvaged and re-commissioned the USS Sailfish.

In 1945, Nazi official Heinrich Himmler committed suicide by biting into a cyanide capsule while in British custody in Luneburg, Germany.

In 1977, the U.S. Supreme Court refused to hear the appeals of former Nixon White House aides H.R. Haldeman and John Ehrlichman and former Attorney General John N. Mitchell in connection with their Watergate convictions. Moluccan extremists seized a train and a primary school in the Netherlands; the hostage drama ended June 11 as Dutch marines stormed the train, resulting in the deaths of six out of nine hijackers and two hostages, while the school siege ended peacefully.

In 1984, Surgeon General C. Everett Koop issued a report saying there was "very solid" evidence linking cigarette smoke to lung disease in non-smokers. "Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom," starring Harrison Ford, was released by Paramount Pictures.

In 1992, top anti-Mafia prosecutor Giovanni Falcone was killed in a remote-controlled highway bombing outside Palermo, Sicily, along with his wife and three police escorts. (Salvatore "Toto" Riina, the Mafia's "boss of bosses," was arrested in Jan. 1993 and was later convicted with others of plotting the assassinations of Falcone and another leading anti-Mafia prosecutor, Paolo Borsellino.)

Ten years ago: President George W. Bush, speaking at the U.S. Coast Guard commencement, portrayed the Iraq war as a battle between the U.S. and al-Qaida and said Osama bin Laden was setting up a terrorist cell in Iraq to strike targets in America. Iraqi police dragged from the Euphrates River a body identified as that of Pfc. Joseph Anzack Jr., who had disappeared during a May 12 ambush claimed by al-Qaida. Jordin Sparks was crowned the new "American Idol" on the Fox reality show.

Five years ago: Egypt held the Arab world's first competitive presidential vote (Islamist Mohammed Morsi was ultimately named the winner following a runoff). A Pakistani doctor who helped the CIA hunt down Osama bin Laden was convicted of conspiring against the state and was sentenced to 33 years in prison; U.S. officials had urged Pakistan to release Dr. Shakil Afridi. (The sentence was later overturned; Afridi faces a retrial.) Phillip Phillips, a bluesy Georgia guitar man, was crowned the new "American Idol" after defeating teenager Jessica Sanchez.

One year ago: During his visit to Asia, President Barack Obama, eager to banish lingering shadows of the Vietnam War, lifted the U.S. embargo on selling arms to America's former enemy. Prosecutors failed for the second time in their bid to hold Baltimore police accountable for the arrest and death of Freddie Gray when an officer was acquitted in the racially charged case that triggered riots a year earlier. The Supreme Court upended the conviction and death sentence of a black Georgia man because prosecutors had improperly excluded African-Americans from his all-white jury. Dr. Henry Heimlich, the 96-year-old retired chest surgeon credited with developing the namesake Heimlich maneuver, used it to save a woman choking on food at his senior living center in Cincinnati.

Today's Birthdays: Bluegrass singer Mac Wiseman is 92. Actress Barbara Barrie is 86. Actress Joan Collins is 84. Actor Charles Kimbrough is 81. International Tennis Hall of Famer John Newcombe is 73. Actress Lauren Chapin is 72. Country singer Misty Morgan is 72. Country singer Judy Rodman is 66. Chess grandmaster Anatoly Karpov is 66. Boxing Hall of Famer Marvelous Marvin Hagler is 63. Singer Luka Bloom is 62. Actor-comedian-game show host Drew Carey is 59. Actress Lea DeLaria is 59. Country singer Shelly West is 59. Actor Linden Ashby is 57. Actress-model Karen Duffy is 56. Actress Melissa McBride is 52. Rock musician Phil Selway (Radiohead) is 50. Actress Laurel Holloman is 49. Rock musician Matt Flynn (Maroon 5) is 47. Singer Lorenzo is 45. Country singer Brian McComas is 45. Actor John Pollono is 45. Singer Maxwell is 44. Singer Jewel is 43. Game show contestant Ken Jennings is 43. Actress Kelly Monaco is 41. Actor D.J. Cotrona is 37. Actor Lane Garrison is 37. Actor-comedian Tim Robinson is 36. Country singer Brett Young is 36. Actor Adam Wylie is 33. Movie writer-director Ryan Coogler is 31. Golfer Morgan Pressel is 29. Folk/pop singer/songwriter Sarah Jarosz (juh-ROHZ') is 26.

Thought for Today: "He who cannot rest, cannot work; he who cannot let go, cannot hold on; he who cannot find footing, cannot go forward." — Henry Emerson Fosdick, American clergyman (1878-1969).

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed..
 


DAILY UPDATE

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HEADLINES [click on headline to view story]

Risky retrieval of Everest bodies raises climbers' concern

Men probing Ivanka Trump brands in China arrested, missing

Australian girl on vacation killed in Baghdad car bomb blast

Armed man in custody at Orlando airport; no one hurt

Today in History - Wednesday, May 31, 2017


Theresa May, Jeremy Corbyn face tough questions on live TV

Thousands turn out to remember Kennedy on his 100th birthday

Tiger Woods blames medications for his arrest on DUI charge

Bomb kills 13, hurts 24 in Baghdad; IS claims responsibility

Today in History - Tuesday, May 30, 2017


Cannes Palme d'Or goes to Ruben Ostlund's "The Square"

More arrests in Manchester attack; UK remains on high alert

BA says most flights running; angry passengers face delays

Alaska volcano erupts again; aviation alert raised to red

Today in History - Monday, May 29, 2017

Today in History - Sunday, May 28, 2017


Rocker Chris Cornell remembered as 'voice of our generation'

Sounds of silence? Trump's body language speaks volumes

Melania Trump wears $51K Dolce & Gabbana jacket in Sicily

Alaska Natives honored for protecting territory during WWII

Today in History - Saturday, May 27, 2017


Stars turn out for lavish French Riviera AIDS fundraiser

1 step forward, 2 steps back for LBGT rights in Asia

UK bomber said to have pleaded 'Forgive me' before blast

Monstrous cyclones churning over Jupiter's poles

Today in History - Friday, May 26, 2017


From fame to shame: Playmate to do time scrubbing graffiti

Sri Lankan president discusses asylum seekers in Australia

Hawaii sues Ford, Nissan and Toyota over dangerous air bags

With an arched brow, Roger Moore found humor in Bond, life

Today in History - Thursday, May 25, 2017


Parents weigh in on concert fears after Manchester

Warning of "imminent" attack, Britain raises threat level

Uber admits stiffing NYC drivers by millions of dollars

Search resumes for 7 missing after fatal bus plunge in India

Today in History - Wednesday, May 24, 2017


19 confirmed dead in explosion at Grande concert

Reaction to Manchester explosion at Ariana Grande concert

Asian shares drift as blast in Manchester rattles investors

Disruptive passenger in Trump cap delays Shanghai flight

Today in History - Tuesday, May 23, 2017

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